Police Foundations

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The Police Foundations program at Algonquin College at the Perth Campus is ideal first step for individuals who want to pursue a career in policing. Our program covers many aspects of law enforcement, including police powers, criminology, professional ethics, investigation and interviewing processes, Canadian law, and defense and control tactics. The Perth Campus small class size is an ideal alternative to individuals looking for a more direct and personal learning environment.

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Bring Your Own Device (BYOD): As a student in this on-campus program, you will require a mobile computing device that meets the specifications outlined by your program at http://algonquincollege.com/byod
(Please note this was previously referred to as a Mobile Learning Program)

Ontario College Diploma
2 Year(s)

Program Code: 0444X01FPT
Academic Year: 2012/2013

Our Program

This two-year Ontario College Diploma program is the first step in preparing students for a career in Law Enforcement or Regulatory Enforcement. Students gain a broad education in human relations skills and the interpretations of social interaction. The curriculum includes courses on police powers and procedures, community policing, investigation processes, diversity, professional ethics and communication.

Bring Your Own Device (BYOD): Students are expected to have and use a laptop or mobile computing device when registered in this on-campus program. Hardware and software specifications required by your program are outlined at www.algonquincollege.com/byod. Mobile devices/laptops and supplies can be purchased directly from Algonquin's New Technology Store at educational rates.

SUCCESS FACTORS

This program is well-suited for students who:Possess good communication (written, verbal, technology) and interpersonal abilities.

  • Are committed to serving the broad and diverse needs of their community.
  • Have analytical and observational skills.
  • Enjoy working as a team member.
  • Your Career

    Graduates who successfully complete the requirements set by individual police services may find employment with municipal, regional and provincial police services in Ontario and the rest of Canada. They may also find employment with related Law or Regulatory Enforcement agencies.

    Application criteria for police services in Ontario are outlined in the Ontario Police Services Act. Applicants must:

    • be a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident of Canada;
    • be at least 18 years of age;
    • be physically and mentally able to perform the duties of the position;
    • be of good moral character and habits;
    • be a graduate of at least four years of secondary school education or its equivalent;
    • possess vision and hearing within acceptable standards;
    • possess a current Standard First Aid Certificate and a current CPR certificate at time of hire;
    • have no criminal convictions for which a pardon has not been granted;
    • pass a medical examination.

    Courses

    Programs at Algonquin College are delivered using a variety of instruction modes. Courses may be offered in the classroom or lab, entirely online, or in a hybrid mode which combines classroom sessions with online learning activities. Upon registration, each full-time student is provided an Algonquin email account which is used to communicate important information about program or course events.
    Level: 01 Hours
    PFP9103 In order to be successful in college and later in the policing profession and in the community, students must learn to adapt to new environments. This includes the ability to manage time, finances and stress, think independently and make critical decisions while focusing on self-awareness and professionalism. Students learn how to take advantage of available college resources and services and understand what is expected of them in the college educational setting, in the community and in the policing profession. Career and College Success In order to be successful in college and later in the policing profession and in the community, students must learn to adapt to new environments. This includes the ability to manage time, finances and stress, think independently and make critical decisions while focusing on self-awareness and professionalism. Students learn how to take advantage of available college resources and services and understand what is expected of them in the college educational setting, in the community and in the policing profession. 30.0
    PFP9113 Students are provided with an overview of the Canadian criminal justice system with a particular emphasis on the history, function, role and organization of Canadian law enforcement services. The operation of the criminal justice system is examined and analyzed in light of contemporary issues affecting the system. Each of the major components from enforcement through the courts and correctional services is explored. Canadian Criminal Justice System Students are provided with an overview of the Canadian criminal justice system with a particular emphasis on the history, function, role and organization of Canadian law enforcement services. The operation of the criminal justice system is examined and analyzed in light of contemporary issues affecting the system. Each of the major components from enforcement through the courts and correctional services is explored. 45.0
    PFP9120 Students learn to apply basic psychological concepts including scientific methods, biological bases of behaviour, perception, states of consciousness, learning, motivation and theories of personality. Emphasis is placed on the causes and consequences of human behaviour including abnormal behaviour. Psychology Students learn to apply basic psychological concepts including scientific methods, biological bases of behaviour, perception, states of consciousness, learning, motivation and theories of personality. Emphasis is placed on the causes and consequences of human behaviour including abnormal behaviour. 45.0
    PFP9130 Students adopt a sociological orientation and theoretical foundation for analysis of social events. Studies of societies, culture, socialization and social change are included. Students study and survey areas relating to Canadian society and culture including social inequalities, social interaction and collective behaviour. Sociology and Canadian Society Students adopt a sociological orientation and theoretical foundation for analysis of social events. Studies of societies, culture, socialization and social change are included. Students study and survey areas relating to Canadian society and culture including social inequalities, social interaction and collective behaviour. 30.0
    PFP9140 Communication remains an essential skill sought by employers, regardless of discipline or field of study. Using a practical, vocation-oriented approach, students focus on meeting the requirements of effective communication. Through a combination of lectures, exercises, and independent learning, students practise writing, speaking, reading, listening, locating and documenting information and using technology to communicate professionally. Students develop and strengthen communication skills that contribute to success in both educational and workplace environments. Communications I Communication remains an essential skill sought by employers, regardless of discipline or field of study. Using a practical, vocation-oriented approach, students focus on meeting the requirements of effective communication. Through a combination of lectures, exercises, and independent learning, students practise writing, speaking, reading, listening, locating and documenting information and using technology to communicate professionally. Students develop and strengthen communication skills that contribute to success in both educational and workplace environments. 45.0
    PFP9153 Focus is on the role of government. Students examine the responsibilities of the three levels of government in Canada and how they are carried out. They learn how public policy is developed and laws are passed through the activities of both the political and public administration branches of government. Current issues facing government in Canada, especially related to law enforcement and the justice system are explored. The role of special interest groups, and transparency and accountability in government are discussed. Political Science and Public Administration Focus is on the role of government. Students examine the responsibilities of the three levels of government in Canada and how they are carried out. They learn how public policy is developed and laws are passed through the activities of both the political and public administration branches of government. Current issues facing government in Canada, especially related to law enforcement and the justice system are explored. The role of special interest groups, and transparency and accountability in government are discussed. 45.0
    PFP9163 Society has come to recognize that personal and collective wellness is essential to enhance the quality of life. Students are introduced to the concept of wellness and are provided with practical strategies for developing and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Through research, self-evaluation, and practical experience students address physical fitness, nutrition and potential health problems. Students set goals, design and implement an effective personal fitness program and personal diet plan to meet these goals. The Physical Readiness Evaluation for Police test (PREP), as well as the Physical Ability Requirement Evaluation test (PARE) are introduced. Fitness and Lifestyle Management I Society has come to recognize that personal and collective wellness is essential to enhance the quality of life. Students are introduced to the concept of wellness and are provided with practical strategies for developing and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Through research, self-evaluation, and practical experience students address physical fitness, nutrition and potential health problems. Students set goals, design and implement an effective personal fitness program and personal diet plan to meet these goals. The Physical Readiness Evaluation for Police test (PREP), as well as the Physical Ability Requirement Evaluation test (PARE) are introduced. 30.0
    Level: 02 Hours
    PFP9200 Various theoretical explanations of criminal and deviant behaviour including the sociological, biological and psychological perspectives are examined. Criminological theory is related to various types of criminal activity. The reality of crime in Canada including victimology is examined through crime statistics, as are the correlations of criminal behaviour. The impact of theory on the development and effectiveness of the criminal justice system is discussed with an emphasis on future trends within the system. Criminology Various theoretical explanations of criminal and deviant behaviour including the sociological, biological and psychological perspectives are examined. Criminological theory is related to various types of criminal activity. The reality of crime in Canada including victimology is examined through crime statistics, as are the correlations of criminal behaviour. The impact of theory on the development and effectiveness of the criminal justice system is discussed with an emphasis on future trends within the system. 30.0
    PFP9210 Students learn to apply knowledge from interpersonal relations and group dynamics to working in a team. Emphasis is placed on utilizing effective communication skills with individuals and groups. Group cohesiveness and group decision making are discussed. Interpersonal and Group Dynamics Students learn to apply knowledge from interpersonal relations and group dynamics to working in a team. Emphasis is placed on utilizing effective communication skills with individuals and groups. Group cohesiveness and group decision making are discussed. 30.0
    PFP9223 Students analyze contemporary social issues using the current social science paradigms and theories. Topics, such as crime, violence, abuse, social stratification, ageism and racism are included. The structure and administration of community organizations, and social services that operate within and adjacent to the criminal justice system are explored. Contemporary Social Problems/Community and Social Services Students analyze contemporary social issues using the current social science paradigms and theories. Topics, such as crime, violence, abuse, social stratification, ageism and racism are included. The structure and administration of community organizations, and social services that operate within and adjacent to the criminal justice system are explored. 45.0
    PFP9230 Students write notebook entries and reports following guidelines used by police agencies. They complete exercises that familiarize them with professional communication practices including business writing. Students develop and enhance their reading and listening skills and acquire effective presentation skills. Communications II Students write notebook entries and reports following guidelines used by police agencies. They complete exercises that familiarize them with professional communication practices including business writing. Students develop and enhance their reading and listening skills and acquire effective presentation skills. 45.0
    PFP9243 Students study the diversity of Canada's population both as a product of its historical immigration background and also within its original Aboriginal population. They look at challenges posed by regional, social and economic differences, as well as age, gender, ethnicity, religion and disabilities. Students examine how immigration patterns and theories of settlement reflect societal values and have resulted in issues, and related government policies and legislation, as well as initiatives within the community. Students have an opportunity to learn more about the rich cultural diversity of First Nations, Inuit and Metis in Canada. They examine the challenges faced by the Aboriginal Peoples of Canada since the arrival of Europeans and trace recent developments in areas such as treaties, land settlement and self-government, as well as social and economic issues, such as health care, education and justice. Issues in Diversity/First Nations Peoples Students study the diversity of Canada's population both as a product of its historical immigration background and also within its original Aboriginal population. They look at challenges posed by regional, social and economic differences, as well as age, gender, ethnicity, religion and disabilities. Students examine how immigration patterns and theories of settlement reflect societal values and have resulted in issues, and related government policies and legislation, as well as initiatives within the community. Students have an opportunity to learn more about the rich cultural diversity of First Nations, Inuit and Metis in Canada. They examine the challenges faced by the Aboriginal Peoples of Canada since the arrival of Europeans and trace recent developments in areas such as treaties, land settlement and self-government, as well as social and economic issues, such as health care, education and justice. 45.0
    PFP9250 Students continue to follow their personal fitness program and personal diet plan, readjusting their goals as necessary. Students are prepared to successfully complete the Physical Readiness Evaluation for Police test (PREP), as well as the Physical Ability Requirement Evaluation Test (PARE). Fitness and Lifestyle Management II Students continue to follow their personal fitness program and personal diet plan, readjusting their goals as necessary. Students are prepared to successfully complete the Physical Readiness Evaluation for Police test (PREP), as well as the Physical Ability Requirement Evaluation Test (PARE). 15.0
    PFP9260 Students analyze the elements of an offence, classify offences and identify possible defences in criminal cases. Students also analyze the rights and obligations of citizens involving areas of civil law. They learn to recognize the responsibilities and limitations of citizens and police officers in light of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Students develop legal research and analytical skills to locate, interpret, and apply statute and case law. Criminal and Civil Law Students analyze the elements of an offence, classify offences and identify possible defences in criminal cases. Students also analyze the rights and obligations of citizens involving areas of civil law. They learn to recognize the responsibilities and limitations of citizens and police officers in light of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Students develop legal research and analytical skills to locate, interpret, and apply statute and case law. 45.0
    Level: 03 Hours
    PFP9303 Students analyze specific elements of selected Criminal Code offences. Provisions of federal statutes and their relationship to the Criminal Code are examined. Criminal Code and Federal Statutes Students analyze specific elements of selected Criminal Code offences. Provisions of federal statutes and their relationship to the Criminal Code are examined. 45.0
    PFP9310 Focus is on interviewing and investigation skills. Students develop the interviewing skills necessary to retrieve information from victims, witnesses and suspects. Students also learn the basic steps of investigation including the practical development of note-taking and observation skills. Interviewing and Investigations Focus is on interviewing and investigation skills. Students develop the interviewing skills necessary to retrieve information from victims, witnesses and suspects. Students also learn the basic steps of investigation including the practical development of note-taking and observation skills. 45.0
    PFP9320 Students develop the knowledge, skills, and ability to locate and apply sections of the Provincial Traffic Law and Criminal Code of Canada. Students practice locating topics in the acts and regulations, master the definitions required to interpret traffic laws and apply the law. Students develop and practice interpersonal strategies and procedures for dealing with motor vehicle stops and traffic accidents. Traffic Management Students develop the knowledge, skills, and ability to locate and apply sections of the Provincial Traffic Law and Criminal Code of Canada. Students practice locating topics in the acts and regulations, master the definitions required to interpret traffic laws and apply the law. Students develop and practice interpersonal strategies and procedures for dealing with motor vehicle stops and traffic accidents. 45.0
    PFP9330 Students adhere to their personal fitness program and personal diet plan, and focus specifically on successful completion of the Physical Readiness Evaluation for Police test (PREP), as well as the Physical Ability Requirement Evaluation test(PARE). Fitness and Lifestyle Management III Students adhere to their personal fitness program and personal diet plan, and focus specifically on successful completion of the Physical Readiness Evaluation for Police test (PREP), as well as the Physical Ability Requirement Evaluation test(PARE). 15.0
    PFP9343 Students are introduced to the career choices available to them upon graduation and provides them with the skills necessary to obtain employment in policing, corrections, security or further criminal justice related fields. Career-related employment testing preparation, interview skills development and resume writing techniques are included. Guest speakers further prepare students for their career choices. Career Preparation Students are introduced to the career choices available to them upon graduation and provides them with the skills necessary to obtain employment in policing, corrections, security or further criminal justice related fields. Career-related employment testing preparation, interview skills development and resume writing techniques are included. Guest speakers further prepare students for their career choices. 30.0
    PFP9353 Pertinent sections of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and their impact on Canadian criminal procedure are examined. Citizen and police arrest and release authorities, police powers of search and seizure with and without a warrant and, police discretion and its implications are discussed. Students become familiar with police terminology and apply the procedures required to affect arrest and release. Police governance and accountability issues related to the Police Services Act, police complaints, First Nations policing and management and labour issues are addressed. Use of force theory, law and other legal issues related to the use of force are discussed. Theory related to officer safety is examined. Police Powers Pertinent sections of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and their impact on Canadian criminal procedure are examined. Citizen and police arrest and release authorities, police powers of search and seizure with and without a warrant and, police discretion and its implications are discussed. Students become familiar with police terminology and apply the procedures required to affect arrest and release. Police governance and accountability issues related to the Police Services Act, police complaints, First Nations policing and management and labour issues are addressed. Use of force theory, law and other legal issues related to the use of force are discussed. Theory related to officer safety is examined. 45.0
    Choose one from equivalencies: Hours
    GED2444 Students choose one course, from a group of general education electives, which meets one of the following five theme requirements: Arts in Society, Civic Life, Social and Cultural Understanding, Personal Understanding, and Science and Technology.

    Equivalencies: ARC9001 or DSN2001 or ENV0002 or FIN2300 or GED1896 or GED5002 or GED5004 or GED5005 or GED5006 or GED5009 or GED5200 or GED5300 or GED6022 or GEN1957 or GEN2000 or GEN2007 or GEN2009 or HIS0001 or HIS2000 or HOS2228 or LIB1982 or MGT7330 or MVM8800 or PSI0003 or RAD2001 or SOC2003
    General Education Elective Students choose one course, from a group of general education electives, which meets one of the following five theme requirements: Arts in Society, Civic Life, Social and Cultural Understanding, Personal Understanding, and Science and Technology.

    Equivalencies: ARC9001 or DSN2001 or ENV0002 or FIN2300 or GED1896 or GED5002 or GED5004 or GED5005 or GED5006 or GED5009 or GED5200 or GED5300 or GED6022 or GEN1957 or GEN2000 or GEN2007 or GEN2009 or HIS0001 or HIS2000 or HOS2228 or LIB1982 or MGT7330 or MVM8800 or PSI0003 or RAD2001 or SOC2003
    45.0
    Level: 04 Hours
    PFP9403 Focus is placed on ethical issues faced by individuals as citizens and professionals. Students clarify their values and establish a framework for ethical decision making. Ethical issues which relate to a wide variety of concerns are examined. Students also examine a variety of professional ethical codes and apply ethical decision-making models to dilemmas in their personal and professional lives. Principles of Ethical Reasoning Focus is placed on ethical issues faced by individuals as citizens and professionals. Students clarify their values and establish a framework for ethical decision making. Ethical issues which relate to a wide variety of concerns are examined. Students also examine a variety of professional ethical codes and apply ethical decision-making models to dilemmas in their personal and professional lives. 45.0
    PFP9413 Students explain and analyze the historical, philosophical and contemporary application of statutes affecting youth in conflict with the law. As well, students examine and analyze, in the context of the Youth Criminal Justice Act and other relevant legislation, the detention, interviewing and processing through the court structure of young persons. In addition, students summarize and appraise disposition alternatives which may be employed with a view to aiding and rehabilitating a young person while facilitating public safety and victim response, if applicable. Youth in Conflict with the Law Students explain and analyze the historical, philosophical and contemporary application of statutes affecting youth in conflict with the law. As well, students examine and analyze, in the context of the Youth Criminal Justice Act and other relevant legislation, the detention, interviewing and processing through the court structure of young persons. In addition, students summarize and appraise disposition alternatives which may be employed with a view to aiding and rehabilitating a young person while facilitating public safety and victim response, if applicable. 30.0
    PFP9420 Students examine scenarios and determine the appropriate enforcement action for the most common provincial statutes. Topics studied include arrest, search and seizure authorities, common offences and the involvement of non-police agencies. Statutes examined include the Provincial Offences Act, Mental Health Act, Landlord Tenant Act, Trespass to Property Act, Liquor License Act, Child and Family Services Act, Family Law Act, Blind Persons Act and Game and Fish Act. Provincial Offences Students examine scenarios and determine the appropriate enforcement action for the most common provincial statutes. Topics studied include arrest, search and seizure authorities, common offences and the involvement of non-police agencies. Statutes examined include the Provincial Offences Act, Mental Health Act, Landlord Tenant Act, Trespass to Property Act, Liquor License Act, Child and Family Services Act, Family Law Act, Blind Persons Act and Game and Fish Act. 30.0
    PFP9430 Students examine the requirements of a continuing investigation and crime scene management. They learn the rules of evidence and develop the ability to apply these rules in the collection and presentation of evidence in a court of law. Forensic requirements, statute law and other related issues are emphasized. Investigation and Evidence Students examine the requirements of a continuing investigation and crime scene management. They learn the rules of evidence and develop the ability to apply these rules in the collection and presentation of evidence in a court of law. Forensic requirements, statute law and other related issues are emphasized. 45.0
    PFP9440 Students develop the ability to intervene in conflict and crisis situations with competence and confidence. The conflict situation is examined from its inception through intervention by police. Various problem-solving skills and non-violent intervention techniques are discussed along with intervention strategies directed toward specific incidents. Students are taught to recognize behaviour patterns that may lead to violent encounters and the appropriate legal responses to these encounters. These responses emphasize officer safety through awareness and preparation. Conflict Management Students develop the ability to intervene in conflict and crisis situations with competence and confidence. The conflict situation is examined from its inception through intervention by police. Various problem-solving skills and non-violent intervention techniques are discussed along with intervention strategies directed toward specific incidents. Students are taught to recognize behaviour patterns that may lead to violent encounters and the appropriate legal responses to these encounters. These responses emphasize officer safety through awareness and preparation. 45.0
    PFP9453 Students study and apply models of community policing and problem-oriented policing. Crime prevention strategies and elements of community involvement are also examined. Community Policing Students study and apply models of community policing and problem-oriented policing. Crime prevention strategies and elements of community involvement are also examined. 45.0
    PFP9460 Students focus on personal fitness and basic self-defence. Elemental restraint and protection techniques are demonstrated and practised in drills that increase cardiovascular endurance, power, speed, agility and balance. The Ontario Use of Force model is examined along with laws dealing with arrest, use of force and liability for the excessive use of force. Fitness and Self-Defence Students focus on personal fitness and basic self-defence. Elemental restraint and protection techniques are demonstrated and practised in drills that increase cardiovascular endurance, power, speed, agility and balance. The Ontario Use of Force model is examined along with laws dealing with arrest, use of force and liability for the excessive use of force. 30.0

    Fees & Expenses

    Tuition fees listed are in effect for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Tuition Fees: $1,343.89 per term.

    Information Technology Fee: $86 per term. *

    BYOD Fee: $150 per term. **

    Incidental Fee: $40 in Level 01.

    Student Activity/Sports Fee: $240.50 per term.

    Student Commons/Auditorium Fee: $22 per term.

    Student Centre Building Fee: $17.50 per term.

    Student Experience Fee: $17 per term.

    Health Services Fee: $20 per term.

    Health Plan Fee: $123.96 paid once annually. ***

    A $40 graduation fee is payable in the final term.

    A $20 transcript fee is payable in the first term a student attends Algonquin College.

    International Students pay all relevant Canadian fees plus an International Premium of $4,775 per term.

    * Students paying the Information Technology fee are provided with a network account, an email address, and Internet access. For more information please visit our website at www.algonquincollege.com/its/services/it_fee.htm.

    ** The BYOD Fee covers the costs associated with providing various services and software to students registered in a BYOD program.

    *** Students who have coverage with another plan can request a refund by supplying the Students' Association with documentation supporting the request. This request will have to be made annually.

    Books and supplies cost approximately $1,100 in the first year and $1,000 in the second year. Fitness attire costs approximately $100.

    Admission Requirements 

    College Eligibility

    • Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent. Applicants with an OSSD showing senior English and/or mathematics courses at the Basic Level, or with Workplace or Open courses, will be tested to determine their eligibility for admission; OR
    • Academic and Career Entrance (ACE) certificate; OR
    • General Educational Development (GED) certificate; OR
    • Mature Student status (19 years of age or older and without a high school diploma at the start of the program). Eligibility may be determined by academic achievement testing for which a fee of $50 (subject to change) will be charged.
    • Program Eligibility

      • English, Grade 12 (ENG4C or equivalent). /li>
      • Applicants with International transcripts must provide proof of the subject specific requirements noted above along with proof of either: IELTS-International English Language Testing Service-Overall band of 6.0 with a minimum of 5.5 in each band; OR TOEFL-Internet-based (iBT)-overall 80, with the minimum of 20 in each component: Reading 20; Listening: 20 Speaking: 20, Writing: 20

      Should the number of qualified applicants exceed the number of available places, applicants will be selected on the basis of their proficiency in English.

    College Eligibility

    • Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent. Applicants with an OSSD showing senior English and/or mathematics courses at the Basic Level, or with Workplace or Open courses, will be tested to determine their eligibility for admission; OR
    • Academic and Career Entrance (ACE) certificate; OR
    • General Educational Development (GED) certificate; OR
    • Mature Student status (19 years of age or older and without a high school diploma at the start of the program). Eligibility may be determined by academic achievement testing for which a fee of $40 (subject to change) will be charged.

    Program Eligibility

    • English, Grade 12 (ENG4C or equivalent).
    • Applicants with International transcripts must provide proof of either: IELTS-International English Language Testing Service-Overall band of 6.0 with a minimum of 5.5 in each band; OR TOEFL-Internet-based (iBT)-overall 80, with the minimum of 20 in each component: Reading 20; Listening: 20; Speaking: 20, Writing: 20.

    Should the number of qualified applicants exceed the number of available places, applicants will be selected on the basis of their proficiency in English.

    Application Information

    Applications to full-time day programs must be submitted with official transcripts showing completion of the academic admission requirements through:

    ontariocolleges.ca
    60 Corporate Court
    Guelph, Ontario N1G 5J3
    1-888-892-2228

    Students currently enrolled in an Ontario secondary school should contact their Guidance Office to apply. Applications are available online at www.ontariocolleges.ca.>. A $95 fee applies.

    Applications for Fall Term, Winter Term and Spring Term admission received by February 1 will be given equal consideration. Applications received after February 1 will be processed on a first-come, first-served basis as long as places are available.

    International applicants applying from out-of-country can obtain the International Student Application Form at www.ontariocolleges.ca.> or by contacting the Registrar's Office.

    For further information on the admissions process, contact:

    Registrar's Office
    Algonquin College
    Perth Campus
    7 Craig Street
    Perth, ON K7H 1X7
    Telephone: 613-267-2859
    Toll-free: 1-800-565-4723

    Additional Information

    This Full-time day program is also offered on the Woodroffe and Pembroke Campuses. Although the learning outcomes at the Perth, Woodroffe and Pembroke Campuses are the same, the curriculum order and subject delivery are reflective of the local circumstances, which affect program delivery.

    If you have been convicted of an offence under the Criminal Code of Canada for which you have not been granted a pardon, you are strongly encouraged to consult your academic advisor (coordinator) since this may hinder your chances of becoming a police officer. A current Certificate of Criminal Records Check for Service with the Vulnerable Sector is required for Police Foundations students wishing to volunteer on behalf of the program.

    Successful applicants to the Police Foundations program undergo the Physical Readiness Evaluation for Police (P.R.E.P.) test to determine their level of physical fitness. This test is administered within the first few weeks of classes.

    Exemptions for recognized equivalent postsecondary courses are processed at the beginning of each term. Students are advised to see their academic advisor (coordinator) for information.

    Selected Police Foundations courses are also offered on a part-time basis through the Centre for Continuing and Online Learning for students interested in pursuing studies online.

    An Articulation Agreement between Carleton University and Algonquin College permits graduates with an Ontario College Diploma in Police Foundations from Algonquin College to apply for admission into the B.A. program at Carleton University. Successful applicants are granted 5.0 credits on admission towards the completion of a B.A. in either Criminology, Law, Psychology or Sociology if they have completed the Ontario College Diploma in Police Foundations at Algonquin College with an overall B average (Algonquin Grade Point Average of 3.0). Articulation agreements also exist with other postsecondary institutions.

    For more information, contact the Perth Campus at 613-267-2859.

    Every attempt is made to ensure the accuracy of the information in this publication. The College reserves the right to modify or cancel any course, program, fee, timetable, or campus location at any time