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Win a beautiful, handmade quilt by supporting the library

raffle quilt This cozy, handmade wolf quilt in WOU colors could be yours! Buy raffle tickets at the Information Desk in Hamersly to benefit the Library Student Employee Scholarship Fund for your chance to win. We’re selling 1 ticket for $3 or 2 tickets for $5 for a quilt that is valued at $90!

This beautiful Labyrinth patterned quilt is made with brilliant red, silver and black material with a solid black backing. The center is embroidered with a majestic “Northwoods Silhouette Wolf” pattern. The quilt measures 60” x 60” and comes with a hanging strap. It would be a great focal point quilt for a wall, but is also cozy enough to use as a lap quilt on chilly days.

The quilt was handmade and donated by Carol Tripp. It will be on display in the Hamersly Library lobby until the drawing on May 14th. The winner will be notified by 5pm that day. If you have any questions, contact the Hamersly Library Reference Desk at x8-8899.

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Drop-in tutoring hours in the library

Need help with using technology, writing, math, or English as a foreign language? There are now drop-in hours for all of these services right in the library! Tutoring hours start at the beginning of week 2 and go through finals week each term.

–> The Writing Center holds night hours in Room 116 from 7:00-10:00pm, Sunday-Thursday.

–> The English Tutoring Center is open 7:00-10:00 pm, Monday-Thursday in Room 228.

–> The Math Center offers tutoring Monday-Thursday, 10:00am-6:00pm and Friday 10:00am-3:00pm in Room 228. Math tutoring is offered for a limited number of classes.

–> The Technology Resource Center, located in Room 124, offers open tutoring hours this term Monday & Wednesday from 4-8pm, Tuesday & Thursday from 1-5pm.

Daily hours for all tutoring services are also always posted on the left side of the library’s homepage,
right under our own library hours.

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All about textbooks

textbooks Check out our Textbooks Guide for options to buy, rent, and borrow textbooks for your classes this term.

You’ll also find info about where to sell your textbooks back once you’re done with them.

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Campus Printing FAQ

print credits How much does printing cost? A single page (one side) of a black & white printout costs 1 print credit. A single color page (one side) printout costs 5 print credits. Students receive 225 print credits per term.

How do I know how many print credits I have? Log in to the WOU Portal and your balance will be displayed on your homepage. You can also check your print credit balance here.

How do I buy more print credits? Purchase additional credits through WolfWeb under the Student Menu. They start at 50 credits for $2.50 and go up from there. When you buy additional credits, they are immediately available for use.

What if I don’t use all of my print credits? Whatever credits you don’t use roll over to the next term – so if you have 83 remaining after Winter term, you will start Spring term with 308 credits. However, accounts are
wiped clean before each Fall term begins
, and everyone starts again with 225 print credits.

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Hamersly has lots of music for your studying needs

CDs from the library Looking for some study music? The library has hundreds of CDs available for checkout from all sorts of different genres.

From Bon Iver to Kanye West, Bela Fleck to Etta James, Taylor Swift, and The Beatles: whatever your taste we’ve got something for you.

Search Primo (above) for the name of your favorite band or artist to get started.

Happy studying!

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Get some light Spring Break reading @ the library

Just in case you need another reason to be excited that Spring Break is coming up… We just put out some fun “Spring Break Reads” on the 1st floor. Whether your idea of fun is a light beach read, a suspenseful mystery, a sci-fi thriller, or a collection of humorous essays.

No matter what genre, you can be sure they’re perfect for whiling away those lazy break days. Take a study break and check them out!

Spring Break reads

Spring Break reads

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It’s OK to order things OnDemand!

When you run across an article in your research that is available through “Get It Now” or “OnDemand,” don’t let that stop you from getting the article you need.

These terms mean that Hamersly doesn’t have access to the journal that published the article you are looking for, but we can still get the article for you. In order to get access, you will go through a short process – since the library pays (on average around $30) each time an article is viewed through the Articles OnDemand provider’s website, we want to make sure you actually want the article. We budget for Articles OnDemand use though, so we want you to use it when you need it! We simply ask that you:

  • Read the abstract of each article to determine how likely it is to suit your needs before viewing the full text and incurring charges.
  • Be sure to save the article somewhere you will be able to get back to it (e.g. your H:/ drive, My Documents folder on your personal computer, a USB drive) so that the library only pays for it once.

Happy researching!

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Meet your Hamersly staff: Jackson Stalley

Each term, we introduce you to a few of the people who work to make Hamersly your favorite place on campus to do research, study, print your papers, meet with a group, or simply kick back and read in a quiet place.

This week, meet Jackson Stalley. He is an elusive, behind-the-scenes type library employee, but if you have ever used an online resource through the library you’ve benefitted from his hard work. Here’s more about him:

Jackson Stalley What do you do in the library? I work with the serials and electronic resources helping the Collection Management Librarian ensure our serial and electronic collections are accurate and available when patrons want them. I also assist in creating local solutions for data normalization, manipulation and collection needs.

How long have you worked in the library? I’ve worked at Hamersly Library for 8 years and I’ve moved work areas within the library as much as anybody. I started on the second floor in Collection Management then shifted to a different location there before heading to the first floor as a part of Collection Development. I moved back upstairs to my old work area as a member of the merged Tech Services/Collection Development unit a few years ago. Sometimes I am not sure what unit I’m really in…I think it is Collection Management.

What is your education and professional background? I grew up in a small Idaho town and fled the cold for college in the sunny southwest. I debated at the University of New Mexico before moving with my partner to the University of Utah and later WOU where I took computer science and biology classes. I also worked as a student employee in the library. Before moving to Oregon, I worked in beer (worked I said) and later in the outdoor industry specializing in canyoneering and climbing and as an instructor in primitive navigation/survival.

What is the last good book you read? The last book I read that wasn’t about fly fishing was The Political Economy of Human Rights by Noam Chomsky.

What is one thing about the library you think everyone should know? Printed books are power.

What was your favorite book as a kid? My favorite book as a young person was Das Kapital by Karl Marx, or the Bhagavad Gita.

Tell us a fun fact about you! Here are three:

  • I don’t have a cell phone or home computer and I don’t want one. Join me, you’ll love it.
  • I save every penny possible so I can fly fish for incredible fish in amazing places.
  • I recently participated in a university service learning project in an indigenous community in Central America and I organize and help community food/clothing drives, the WOU holiday toy drive, Food Day, the WOU Staff Hardship Fund, and the WOU Food Pantry.
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One more reason to plan ahead when researching

There are two systems through which WOU students, faculty, and staff can obtain books from other libraries that we don’t have in Hamersly: Summit and Interlibrary Loan. What does this mean for you? It’s a matter of time: Summit items get to you in 3-5 days, while Interlibrary Loan items take longer, sometimes up to two weeks.

Summit logo Summit is the shared catalog and borrowing system of the Orbis Cascade Alliance, a consortium of academic libraries in Oregon, Washington and Idaho. This special partnership makes it faster for us to borrow items from Summit libraries and for this reason, it is used to request most books, videos, and CDs that WOU does not own. Interlibrary Loan, consisting of all libraries except the Summit libraries, is used to request articles from journals and any books, videos, and CDs not available in Summit libraries.

The moral of the story? If WOU doesn’t have what you need, request through Summit when possible. If requesting through Interlibrary Loan is your only option, just be aware that it will likely take longer than you’re used to with Summit. No matter what system, however, the library can almost always get you what you need!

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Meet your Hamersly staff: Dr. Allen McKiel

Each term, we introduce you to a few of the people who work to make Hamersly your favorite place on campus to do research, study, print your papers, meet with a group, or simply kick back and read in a quiet place.

This week, meet Dr. Allen McKiel, our Dean of the Library:

Dean McKiel What do you do in the library? As dean of the library I am responsible to the university through the Academic Vice President for the administration of the library. My responsibilities include overseeing the library’s budget, coordinating its planning, operations, and personnel, and acting as liaison to the Academic Vice President and his management team.

How long have you worked in the library? A little over 7 years

What is your education and professional background? My undergraduate is in English Literature from Purdue University; the Master is in Library and Information Technology from Indiana University; and the Ph.D. is in Higher Education Administration from Indiana State University.

My first professional job after my Master was as a programmer for a large software development firm in Los Angeles, CA. Libraries were not hiring at the time because Proposition 13 had destroyed the tax base in California. Programming eventually took me back to libraries with programming jobs at companies that serve libraries, OCLC and then Notice at Northwestern University. Stepping out of the library realm, I worked for a few years as the Senior Systems Analyst for Planning at the Indiana Toll Road. From there I found my current career as an academic librarian, first as the Director of Libraries for Region 2 of Ivy Tech State College, then as Director of Libraries for Northeastern State University in Oklahoma, finally landing here in the most delightful of all my professional experiences at Western Oregon University.

What is one thing about the library you think everyone should know? Libraries are the collective efforts of society to provide equitable access to its intellectual and cultural heritage. They will continue indefinitely into the future albeit in forms integral to society’s evolving information and communication infrastructure.

What is the last good book you read? Pedagogy of the Oppressed by Paulo Freire.

What was your favorite book as a kid? The Hardy Boys series by Franklin W. Dixon.

Tell us a fun fact about you! I have a 2-year-old grandson that loves anything with wheels. He goes “beep, beep, beep!” when he backs up.

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