Monthly Archives: December 2013

WordPress Now Available to Faculty and Staff

Isn’t it about time you got a better website? I have exciting news for WOU’s faculty and staff. WOU is now making WordPress, the best website management tool on the market, available for anyone who wants it for a personal, work-related site. It makes creating and updating a website super easy — almost as easy as Microsoft Word! Toolbars, drag-and-drop, the whole enchilada.

No Dreamweaver, no saving to a “P” drive, and certainly no clunky HMTL. Just type and hit the publish button.

Whether you want to create pages for your courses, blog about your research, or post pictures of the giant sequoia, WordPress will make it a snap.

Interested? Drop me a line and I’ll create a WordPress site for you. It won’t replace any existing website you have until you’re ready, so you’re free to take it for a test drive. I’m also happy to schedule one-on-one training session in your office or here in the Technology Resource Center (HL 124), and I’ll be available to assist you as you customize and improve your site. I can also help you move over existing content.

By some estimates, over two billion people worldwide now have Internet access. You can reach them literally with the click of a button. Maintaining a personal website is not only easy, it’s also good for WOU’s outreach and marketing efforts, which benefits from all those beautiful pictures of the giant sequoia you’ll share with the world.

Still not convinced?  Check out a few of these videos on the benefits of using WordPress (you can ignore anything about installing Worpdress, which you won’t need to do):

And if you’re thinking of using WordPress in a non-WOU capacity, here’s a longer video that will walk you through the entire process:

If you’re ready to make the jump to WordPress, drop me a line.

Posted in Website Management and Blogging

Libraries of the Future?

How can the libraries of the present and future be influenced by those of the past?  Ted Colegrove, giving a talk at TEDxReno, offers one possible vision of where libraries might be headed.

Posted in Creativity, Libraries, Publishing, Technology Resource Center