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Tuesday September 2, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

School of Medicine professor wins national teaching award

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Kelly E. Melvin, an assistant professor in the department of psychiatry and behavioral medicine at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, has been selected to receive an Association for Academic Psychiatry (AAP) Early Career Development Award.

The AAP says the annual award involves a competitive process and was created to facilitate career development and recognize young faculty who are innovative in their teaching techniques and skills.

Melvin was nominated by Dr. Suzanne Holroyd, chairwoman of the department.

"Dr. Melvin is a fantastic clinician and dedicated teacher," Holroyd said. "His passion for psychiatry shines while teaching our students, which has had a very positive effect on the students' interest in psychiatry. He is an ideal academic faculty member and I am fortunate he is in our department. I am thrilled he was chosen for this national recognition, which he most certainly deserves."

Melvin is a 2005 graduate of the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.  He completed a residency in general adult psychiatry as well as a child psychiatry fellowship at Vanderbilt University and joined Marshall's School of Medicine in November, 2012.

"Receiving this award is a huge honor," Melvin said.  "It's very humbling that Dr. Holroyd nominated me and multiple students wrote letters on my behalf.  I love teaching.  It gives me the opportunity to make students excited about caring for patients who have mental health conditions."

Melvin will receive the award at a meeting in September in Portland, Oregon.

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Tuesday September 2, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Maelzel Woodwind Quintet to present "Music from the Age of Invention"

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Four Marshall University music faculty members, flutist Dr. Wendell Dobbs, hornist Dr. Stephen Lawson, bassoonist Kay Lawson and oboist Dr. Richard Kravchak will be joined by guest clarinetist Dr. Richard Spece for a program titled "Music from the Age of Invention." It will take place at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 11, in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.

The five chose to call themselves the Maelzel Woodwind Quintet, as their "Age of Invention" program nods to the early 19th century - a time when inventions such as Maelzel's time-keeping contraption and musical and technical innovations marked the artistic landscape in Europe.

"Though woodwind quintet music has been well represented at Marshall, this particular program will be different since all involved will not perform on modern instruments, but on historical reproductions of instruments that existed in the late 18th and early 19th centuries," Dobbs said. "The instruments vary considerably from their modern counterparts. They naturally sound differently and they require a whole new technique when playing."

This repertoire of music for five wind instruments began life in late 18th and early 19th century Paris, when numerous multi-movement works featuring the five winds of the classical era orchestra - flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon and horn - were composed by Anton Reicha, Franz Danzi and others. Though the horn is not a woodwind instrument, the convenient name woodwind quintet has described the combination for many generations.

"Music from the Age of Invention" will feature works by Reicha and Danzi, as well as by Peter M�ller.

"One might ask: Why go to the trouble to learn a new technique and perform on instruments that are often more difficult technically than the modern counterparts?" Dobbs said. "Exploring this music on the original instruments provides musicians the opportunity to fully understand the intrinsic problems of blend, balance and intonation, and most importantly, the interpretation, oftentimes inspired by these instruments.

"In essence, we hear the same sounds as the composers and musicians from the era and this informs our decisions on numerous aspects of the music and indeed permits us and our audience to understand the music in ways that may be obscured by the louder, more homogenized sounds of modern instruments."

Spece has taught at the University of Maryland, Baltimore Campus, and performs regularly with a host of groups including Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra, Portland Baroque Orchestra, Ama Deus Ensemble, California Bach Society, Magnificat, Classical Consort, Concert Spirituel, and Opera Lafayette. He is also a founding member of Circa 1800 Chamber Winds. His newest adventure in his new home in Richmond, Virginia, is to establish a period instrument orchestra that will be called the Mannheim Rocket. Spece's appearance is sponsored by a contribution from Dr. Alan Gould, director of the John Deaver Drinko Academy at Marshall.

The Sept. 11 program is free and open to the public. Call 304-696-3117 for more information.

The program will be repeated at 2 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 14, as part of the Ariel Chamber Theatre Series at the Historic Ariel-Dater Hall in Gallipolis, Ohio. Admission for the repeat performance is $5; call 740-446-ARTS for more information on that performance.

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Thursday August 28, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

School of Medicine announces creation of six new scholarships

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Six new scholarships have been established at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine to assist medical students with their educational expenses. 

The following scholarships were created through the school's "Adopt a Medical Student" program, which is a graduated giving program that allows gifts to be made annually until the fund becomes fully endowed.

-  The Becker Family Scholarship was created by Dr. James "Jim" B. Becker, Class of 1993 and senior associate dean for clinical affairs at the school of medicine, and will be awarded to a rising fourth-year medical student who is planning to pursue a career in family medicine. The $1,000 award will be given to three medical students annually.

-  The Elizabeth Scholarship will be awarded to an entering medical student from West Virginia, and was created by Dr. Cindy Z. Pinson, Class of 1996. This scholarship is in memory of Liz Pinson and Beth Bondurant, two women who bravely fought cancer. The award is renewable for three additional years pending normal academic progress.

-  The Evans Family Scholarship was created by Dr. Joseph "Joe" E. Evans, Class of 1982 and chairman of the school's department of pediatrics, and will be awarded to an entering medical student with first preference to a graduate of Spring Valley High School in Wayne County, W.Va. This award is renewable for three additional years pending normal academic progress.

-  The Dr. and Mrs. Scott E. Miller Family Scholarship will be awarded to a first-year medical student who is a West Virginia resident and has financial need as per Office of Student Financial Assistance standards. Dr. Miller, Class of 1986, who is a cardiologist in Charleston, created the scholarship in honor of Cynthia A. "Cindy" Warren, director of admissions for the School of Medicine. The award is renewable for three additional years pending normal academic progress.

-  The Dr. Thomas B. Styer Scholarship was endowed by Dr. Styer, Class of 1982, and Mrs. Julia Styer. The recipient will be an entering medical student, with first preference given to a graduate of Piarist School in Floyd County, Ky. The second preference will be given to a graduate of St. Joseph Central Catholic High School in Huntington and the third preference given to a Cabell County resident. The award is renewable for three additional years to the first two preferences, pending normal academic progress.

-  The Dr. Donnah Wolodkin Whitaker Scholarship was created by Dr. Wolodkin Whitaker, Class of 1984, who is a practicing anesthesiologist in northeast Ohio.  The recipient of this scholarship will be an entering medical student who is a resident of West Virginia.   First preference will be given to a resident of Wheeling, W.Va. If there are no applicants from Wheeling, preference will be given to a resident of Ohio County, Marshall County, or any other county in W.Va., in that order.

"Our medical school's core mission is dedicated to educating students who will become primary care doctors and serve our nation's rural populations," said Linda Holmes, director of development and alumni affairs for the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine. "By helping reduce student debt, we allow students freedom to choose specialties based on interest and not on how they are compensated."

For more information on the scholarships or to make a gift to the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, please contact Linda Holmes at 304-691-1711 or holmes@marshall.edu.

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Thursday August 28, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall Medical Outreach teams with Cabell Huntington Hospital for women's health event

Future outreach events planned this fall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall Medical Outreach, a medical student-led organization that provides free medical care to the homeless and unemployed population in the area, recently teamed with Cabell Huntington Hospital (CHH), the CHH Breast Health Center and the Edwards Comprehensive Cancer Center to provide an afternoon of health and wellness events for more than two dozen women.

Twenty-five women, identified through local social service agencies, were invited to the inaugural "Mamm & Glam" event where free mammograms were provided through a grant awarded from Susan G. Komen for the Cure West Virginia.  The mammograms were read on site by a Cabell Huntington Hospital radiologist.

Wellness consults, hair and nail services, lunch, yoga instruction, and goodie bags including health, hygiene, and makeup items were also offered.

In addition to the major sponsors listed above, the following businesses participated: True Blue Salon; Studio 8; Cabell Huntington Health Department; Qdoba Mexican Grill; Honeybaked Ham; River & Rail Bakery; plus dozens of individuals and private groups.

Missy Browning, education coordinator for the department of psychiatry at the School of Medicine and  MMO events coordinator, said the focused event on women's health was a huge success.

"We were so pleased to be able to collaborate with our partners and offer free mammograms to these at-risk women," she said.  "Having the results read while the ladies were on site was also important, because it can be difficult to follow up with this population in the event further screening is needed, since many of them do not have permanent housing or telephones. Therefore, we planned an event for the ladies to participate in - hair styling, manicures, a makeup bar, yoga instruction, and lunch - ensuring they could enjoy an afternoon of royal treatment while the radiologist read the scans."

Browning thanked the community for its response to the event which included donations by religious groups, work-site groups and individuals. She said social media played a huge role in spreading the news about donations for the event. 

"I was amazed at the community's response to this event.  While we have a dedicated group of individuals who assist on MMO projects, the Mamm & Glam event resulted in volunteers and organizations that hadn't previously served with our team," she said.  "After posting the event on Facebook, we had an outpouring of support."

"Our team was amazed at the outpouring from the community to help sponsor this event," said Marsha Dillow, RN MSN CBCN, Director, Breast Health Center and Edwards Comprehensive Cancer Diagnostic Breast Center.  "Missy Browning and her team did a tremendous job with the planning of the event. She is very compassionate about reaching out to others and it showed through the great success of this event.  The success of partnering with Marshall Medical Outreach was demonstrated during the Mamm & Glam and we look forward to working with them in future events."

Marshall Medical Outreach provides monthly care one Saturday a month beginning at 9 a.m. at Trinity Episcopal Church in Huntington.  Future dates are as follows:

-  September 20th
-  October 25th
-  November 22nd
-  December 27th

For more information or to volunteer, please contact Missy Browning at clagg11@marshall.edu.

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Wednesday August 27, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Georgetown professor of law will be first speaker this fall in Amicus Curiae Lecture Series at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Laura K. Donohue, a professor of law and director of the Center on National Security and the Law at Georgetown University Law Center, will be the featured speaker Thursday, Sept. 11, in the first installment of the fall 2014 Amicus Curiae Lecture Series at Marshall University.

The Amicus Curiae - or "Friend of the Court" - Lecture Series on Constitutional Democracy focuses on issues of law, history, politics and governance in the United States of America. It is sponsored by Marshall's Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy, with financial support from the West Virginia Humanities Council.

Donohue's lecture, titled "The Future of Privacy, Uncertain," will take place at 7 p.m. at the Marshall University Foundation Hall, Home of the Erickson Alumni Center, on the Huntington campus. Two other Amicus Curiae lectures will be given this fall. Donohue describes her lecture as focusing on individual privacy in an age of terrorism and resulting heightened security.

"On June 6, 2013, the Washington Post and The Guardian captured public attention by reporting that the intelligence community was collecting large amounts of information about U.S. citizens," she explained. "The National Security Agency (NSA) was tapping directly into the central servers of nine leading U.S. Internet companies extracting audio, video, photographs, e-mails, documents and connection logs that enable analysts to track a person's movements and contacts over time.  The NSA, it has since been learned, relied upon post-9/11 legislation to support these and other surveillance programs. Information obtained by the intelligence committee for national security purposes can then be used for criminal prosecution, without any of the protections that ordinarily accompany law enforcement investigations."

Donohue has been a project director for the U.S. Justice Department and the Department of Homeland Security on projects related to mass-terror incidents. She earned her A.B. in Philosophy (with Honors) from Dartmouth College, her M.A. in Peace Studies (with Distinction) from the University of Ulster, Northern Ireland, her J.D. (with Distinction) from Stanford Law School, and her Ph.D. in History from the University of Cambridge. She is a life member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Here is a brief look at each of the other two speakers and their topics scheduled this fall:

7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014: David O. Stewart, a graduate of Yale College and Yale Law School and a former law clerk to Supreme Court Associate Justice Lewis F. Powell Jr., will speak on the subject of his book, "American Emperor: Aaron Burr's Challenge to Jefferson's America."

7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 20, 2014: Samuel Issacharoff, the Bonnie and Richard Reiss Professor of Constitutional Law at New York University's School of Law, will speak on the future of voting rights in America in his lecture, "Ballot Bedlam."

Stewart's and Issacharoff's lectures also will take place in the Foundation Hall.

"We are thrilled that, for the fourth consecutive year, the Simon Perry Center will be able to offer this series to the community, and grateful for the financial support of the West Virginia Humanities Council that enables us to do so," said Patricia Proctor, director of the Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy.

For more information on the Amicus Curiae Lecture Series, contact Proctor at 304-696-2801.

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Tuesday August 26, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall celebrates grand opening of Towers Learning Center

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University celebrated the grand opening of the Towers Learning Center, a new academic support resource for students, with a ribbon cutting today in the Twin Towers East lobby on Marshall's Huntington campus.

The center was developed to provide late-night, peer tutoring and mentoring to first-year students. The facility has up-to-date technology and ample space for study groups and academic programs. Faculty-in-residence and student academic mentors will staff the center.

"This is a very important event recognizing a resource initiative for and on behalf of our students," said Marshall President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp. "Hopefully, this is the start of something that will continue to grow around campus. We have an absolute commitment to the success of our students - every student. We are pleased to provide these types of opportunities for our students. I commend the residence hall staff, the student mentors and the support staff for bringing this project to fruition."

The center is open to all Marshall students not just those living in Towers East. The student academic mentors will staff the Towers Learning Center from 5 to 11 p.m. Monday-Thursday. At all other times, students can check out the key at the front desk of Twin Towers East.

The center has a number of resources available to students, including:
-          SMART board
-          Computer
-          Printer
-          General education books
-          Study skills materials
-          Office/school supplies
-          Large study table and chairs

--------------

Photo: Marshall University President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, left, joins in a ribbon cutting celebrating the grand opening of the Towers Learning Center today in Twin Towers East. Joining Kopp in the ribbon cutting are, from left, Amy Lorenz, assistant director of academic initiatives with the Department of Housing and Residence Life, student academic mentors Keigan Aabel-Brown and Brittany Ochoa, and John Yaun, director of Housing and Residence Life. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.  

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Tuesday August 19, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

BB&T continues support for capitalism center at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University today received the seventh installment in a series of gifts from BB&T supporting the BB&T Center for the Advancement of American Capitalism at MU's College of Business.

David L. Helmer, Senior Vice President and Regional Corporate Banking Manager for BB&T, presented the latest check for $100,000 to Marshall President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp.

Marshall's Center for the Advancement of American Capitalism sponsors a lecture series and upper-division course in capitalism for business students, among other activities.

"The course has been very intriguing for our students and the objective of the program has been more than met," Kopp said. "We're very proud of our association with BB&T."

---------------

Photo: David L. Helmer, Senior Vice President and Regional Corporate Banking Manager for BB&T, third from left, presents a check for $100,000 to Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp, second from left, in support of the BB&T Center for the Advancement of American Capitalism at MU's College of Business. Also representing BB&T is Patrick Murphy, second from right. The center is under the direction of Dr. Calvin Kent, left. Dr. Haiyang Chen, right, is dean of Marshall's College of Business. The presentation took place today in the Marshall University Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center on MU's Huntington campus. The BB&T Foundation also presented Marshall with a second check for $15,000. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.

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Monday August 18, 2014
Contact: Beth Caruthers, College of Arts and Media, 304-696-3296

Marshall University Choral Union rehearsals begin Sept. 8

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - If you're interested in being a part of a unique choral ensemble that combines talented students with enthusiastic, choral music-loving members of the greater Huntington community, Marshall University Choral Union Conductor Robert Wray knows the place for you.

Open to any interested community members, Marshall University's Choral Union will hold its first rehearsal of Handel's "Messiah" at 7 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 8, in room 150 of Smith Music Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.

Following about a dozen Monday rehearsals, the group will perform with Marshall University's orchestra at 7:30 p.m. and 3 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 4, and Sunday, Dec. 7, respectively, at the Fifth Avenue Baptist Church in downtown Huntington.

" 'Messiah' is arguably the most well-known large work for a chorus and orchestra," Wray said. "It's a great opportunity as a conductor to be able to perform these types of works."

Wray said this work of Handel tells the story of Jesus Christ, from Isaiah's prophecy of salvation to the acclamation of the Messiah. It was first performed in London in the eighteenth century.

There are no membership fees to be a part of the group, but members are responsible for the purchase of their own music. For more information about joining the Marshall University Choral Union, contact Wray by phone at 304-696-2399 or by e-mail at wrayr@marshall.edu. To stay up to date on rehearsals, visit the group's Facebook page at www.facebook.com/MUchoralunion.
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Friday August 15, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall and Mountwest team up to offer collaborative programs

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -  The Marshall University College of Health Professions and Mountwest Community & Technical College have joined together to provide collaborative programs that will allow students to earn an Associate of Science degree at Mountwest and then transfer to Marshall for a bachelor's degree.

Dr. Carol Perry, dean of the Liberal Arts & Transfer Division at Mountwest, said for many students, higher education is an intimidating undertaking. Perry said collaborative programs such as these help ease the transition of transfer students by providing a clear pathway to earning a bachelor's degree.

"By starting at a community and technical college, students can enjoy smaller class sizes, adjust to postsecondary education and build their self-confidence," Perry said. "Students also can earn a credential that will provide them with something to build upon as they continue their academic endeavors to obtain a baccalaureate degree."

Perry said the program also will allow students to take on less debt while starting their academic career, which is an important factor to consider when pursuing higher education.

Dr. Michael Prewitt, dean of the College of Health Professions, said this partnership will provide a mutually beneficial relationship for both institutions and their students.

"We are seeing a reduction in high school graduates in the state. An increase in the transfer student population will help to combat this and hopefully work toward improving the overall economic development within our community," Prewitt said. "Because our students will be able to make a seamless transition from a two-year to a four-year program, we can help them succeed while improving overall retention and graduation rates."

Collaborative programs will be offered in the fields of athletic training, biomechanics, communication disorders, dietetics, exercise science, health sciences, medical imaging, medical lab technology, nursing, public health, respiratory care, social work and sport management/marketing.

"This is a forward-looking opportunity to redesign and rethink the collaboration between the community colleges and the senior institutions by providing students open pathways to pursue a wide array of degree opportunities," said Dr. David Pittenger, Marshall's interim associate vice president for outreach and continuing studies and dean of the graduate college. "It gives the students flexibility in terms of their long-term planning. This is a model that Marshall University is eager to pursue with the community colleges in the region so that we can better address our responsibility to provide accessibility to high quality education to all West Virginia students."

For more information on Mountwest, visit www.mctc.edu. For more information on Marshall's College of Health Professions, visit www.marshall.edu/cohp.

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Thursday August 14, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

School of Medicine names new assistant dean of student affairs

Amy M. Smith promoted to new role

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Amy M. Smith, BSN, M.Ed., has been appointed assistant dean of student affairs at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, the school's dean, Joseph I. Shapiro, M.D., announced today. Smith began her new role Aug. 1.

"I'm very excited about Ms. Amy Smith for this position," Shapiro said.  "She has a terrific connection with our students; in fact, during the search process students spontaneously came together to endorse her candidacy. She is also a dedicated and caring teacher who understands the unique mission of our medical school. I couldn't be more pleased that she has taken on this expanded role with the school."

Since 2009, Smith has worked at the School of Medicine as the assistant director of medical education, specifically directing the clinical skills center and standardized patient program. Prior to joining the school, she served as the director of women's and children's services at Cabell Huntington Hospital, as well as nurse manager for the neonatal intensive care unit at CHH.

"I would like to thank the search committee and Dr. Shapiro for allowing me to serve in this position," Smith said. "I feel very humbled and blessed to be given the responsibility to work with a team of outstanding faculty, staff and administrators that will work together to meet the needs of the medical students.  I am looking forward to moving future physicians into the next chapters of their lives."

Smith received her diploma in nursing from St. Mary's School of Nursing in 1990.  She then completed a bachelor's degree in nursing from the University of Phoenix and a master's in education from the University of Cincinnati.

She serves on various committees at the School of Medicine including Admissions, Curriculum, Multicultural Advisory and Interprofessional Education.   Smith received the Student Appreciation Award in May 2012 and the Dean's Award for Excellence in Collaboration in 2014.

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Monday August 11, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall Health opens new community pharmacy at medical center

Facility to provide inpatient and outpatient services

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall Health, in partnership with the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, the Marshall University School of Pharmacy and Cabell Huntington Hospital, has opened a new community pharmacy offering patients access to prescription medications at the Marshall University Medical Center.

Marshall Pharmacy is a convenient option for patients and the public visiting the health sciences campus, as well as hospital and medical center staff.  It offers a full range of prescription medication services, including personalized pharmacist services, and carries limited over-the-counter medications and diabetic and medical supplies.

Future plans include delivering discharge medications to Cabell Huntington Hospital inpatients before they leave the hospital, and delivering prescription medications directly to patients upon leaving the doctor's office.

The Marshall Pharmacy is staffed by professional registered pharmacists and pharmacy technicians and accepts most major prescription drug plans.  There are plans to add additional insurance plans in the coming months.

"Marshall is continuing its commitment to our patients and our community by providing high quality pharmacy services at this new facility," said Beth Hammers, executive director of Marshall Health. "Our on-site pharmacy is a tremendous asset for our patients and employees and will enhance the educational experience for our students at the Schools of Pharmacy and Medicine."

In describing the new pharmacy and its educational impact, Dr. Kevin W. Yingling, dean of the School of Pharmacy, called it a key milestone in the growth of the health sciences programs at Marshall. He emphasized the impact of medication therapy management delivered by pharmacists in ambulatory practice settings has proven value for improving patient safety and clinical outcomes.

"I can't stress enough the importance of this new venture, which allows better collaboration among physicians, pharmacists and other health care providers, which in turn provides interdisciplinary education that is absolutely crucial in today's health care arena," Yingling said.   "Working as a team with our colleagues at the School of Medicine and Marshall Health enhances the experiences for all our students."

Dr. Joseph I. Shapiro, dean of the School of Medicine, said the opening of the Marshall Pharmacy reflects the changing health care landscape.

"The collaborative effort among our university counterparts and our hospital partner is indicative of the relationships that must exist as we move forward in the health care arena," Shapiro said.   "These partnerships allow us to be more patient focused and deliver high-quality care for the region."

"The new Marshall Pharmacy is a welcomed addition to our campus because it delivers an important health care service for our patients by making an easier transition from hospital to home," said Kevin Fowler, senior vice president and chief operating officer for Cabell Huntington Hospital. "The pharmacy is easily accessible for patients attending appointments with their physicians at Marshall or picking up new medications following a hospital stay, and for patients receiving treatments at the Edwards Comprehensive Cancer Center. The pharmacy offers patients a convenient option following procedures or treatments by eliminating an extra stop when they're heading home to continue their recovery. This is a unique opportunity to provide patients with on-site education about their medications that coincides with the doctor's visit, typically resulting in improved outcomes and safety."

The Marshall Pharmacy is led by Brian Gallagher, R.Ph., JD, director of pharmacy services and Ben Kelly, R.Ph., the managing pharmacist. The service is located at the front entrance of the Marshall University Medical Center.  It is open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Patients may access pharmacy services by calling 304-691-6879 (MURx) or by visiting  http://www.marshallhealth.org and selecting "Pharmacy"  under "Services." A smartphone app is also available for download through the iTunes(R) Store or Amazon's Android app store.

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Thursday August 7, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Nine MU students to spend 2014-2015 academic year studying in Japan

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Nine students from Marshall University will be going to Japan for the 2014-2015 academic year to study at two institutions: Kansai Gaidai University and Chukyo University.

"I am thrilled that these students will have the opportunity to study abroad in Japan.  This will be a life-changing experience and will lead to great opportunities in the future," said Dr. R. B. Bookwalter, dean of Marshall's College of Liberal Arts.

Seven students will be attending Kansai Gaidai University in the Osaka prefecture. They are:

  • Michael Joseph Haverty (Parkersburg, W.Va. -- Japanese major with a double minor in Asian Studies and International Affairs);
  • Leah Goss (Fairmont and Elkins, W.Va. -- Double major in Japanese and Visual Arts with an emphasis in photography);
  • Kyle Elliot Walters (Cowen, W.Va. -- Double major in International Affairs and Japanese);
  • Lucy J. Ward (Huntington, W.Va. -- Double major in International Business and Japanese);
  • Kiersten Ward (Pineville, W.Va. -- Double major in Geography and Japanese);
  • Savannah Henry (Boyd County, Ky. -- Double major in Japanese and Visual Arts with an emphasis in Graphic Design); and,
  • Brianna McLaughlin (Beaver, W.Va. - Japanese major).

    Two students will be attending Chukyo University in the Nagoya prefecture. They are:

  • Katherine Green (Beckley, W.Va. -- Japanese major with a minor in English); and,
  • Shaina Wallace (Lewisburg, W.Va. -- Triple major in Japanese, English and Education).

Together, the group will receive more than $34,000 from the following awards: Art Department Tuition Waiver, Kimbler Award, Art Department Scholarship, River Cities Scholarship, Cracker Barrel Foundation International Scholarship, American Association of Teachers of Japanese Bridging Scholarship, Benjamin A. Gilman Scholarship and Morgan-Stanley Bridging Scholarship.

"I am deeply grateful for the financial support of our benefactors, whose generosity makes it possible for students to take advantage of an opportunity that some would otherwise have to pass up," Bookwalter said. "I greatly appreciate the excellent work of the Modern Languages program, Dr. [Caroline] Perkins, Dr. [Natsuki] Anderson, Dr. [Zelideth] Rivas and Ms. Kawada Webb, in preparing these students for their work in Japan and for nurturing the partnerships that have helped this program grow."

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Tuesday August 5, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Smith, McComas assume interim roles at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Gayle Ormiston, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at Marshall University, today announced that two university administrators have assumed new roles.

Dr. Sherri Smith, executive director of the Center for Teaching and Learning, has accepted an interim appointment as associate vice president for academic affairs and dean of undergraduate studies.  Smith's appointment took effect July 28, 2014, and runs through June 30, 2015. 

Also, Ormiston announced that Dr. Karen McComas, assistant director of the Center for Teaching and Learning, has agreed to serve as executive director of the center in an interim appointment, which began July 28, 2014, and runs through June 30, 2015.

"I look forward to the many positive contributions Sherri and Karen will undoubtedly make to advancing student persistence and success initiatives, positive learning experiences, and supporting faculty professional development and success," Ormiston said.

Smith served as the director of the Service Learning Program from its inception in 2002 until she was appointed director of the Center for Teaching and Learning in 2008.

As part of a service learning course that she taught, Smith founded Dress for Success River Cities in 2006 and also served as executive director until July 2009. This nonprofit organization provides appropriate attire and a social network to disadvantaged women who are seeking a new career.

Smith earned a BA in 1986 in English and Journalism Education from Marshall; an MA in 1989 in Theology and Ethics from Northern Theological Seminary; an MA in 1993 in English from Northwestern University; and a Ph.D. in 2000 in Victorian Literature, with a doctoral certification in women's studies from Indiana University.

As a member of the English department faculty from 1999 to 2008, she has taught numerous courses at Marshall, including British Literature; 19th Century British Novel, Pre-Raphaelite Literature and Introduction to Women' Studies. She has also taught First Year Seminar during her appointment in the Center for Teaching and Learning.

McComas joined the faculty of Marshall University in August of 1986, teaching and supervising in the undergraduate and graduate programs in the Communication Disorders department. Previously, she worked as a speech-language pathologist in the public school systems of Carter County, Kentucky, and Lincoln County, West Virginia, from 1978 to 1986.

McComas earned a BA in 1977 and an MA in 1978 in Speech Pathology and Audiology from Marshall. In 2011, she earned a doctoral degree, majoring in Curriculum and Instruction with an area of emphasis in social inquiry.

She has taught numerous courses at Marshall, including the capstone course for undergraduate students majoring in Communication Disorders, phonological disorders, and therapeutic procedures. McComas' research interests include the development of research identities in women, the cultural practices of a community of research practice, and the scholarship of teaching and learning.

In addition to her duties in the Center for Teaching and Learning, McComas also serves as the university's NCAA Faculty Athletic Representative.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday August 4, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Dean's list available on Marshall website

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The names of Marshall University students who made the dean's list for the Spring 2014 semester are available on the Marshall website for use by the media.

To make the dean's list, students must have a 3.3 or above grade point average for a minimum of 12 hours. Marshall has 2,564 students included on the website. Students who requested their names not be published are excluded from the list.

Many students and their parents have requested that Marshall make the dean's list available to publications that cover their hometowns.

Each student's name, hometown, county (for West Virginia) and state are included on the dean's list, which is accessible at http://www.marshall.edu/ucomm/deans-list-for-spring-2014/.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday May 14, 2014
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

Senior Vice President's office renamed as Jacobs-Jones begins position

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University office of the Senior Vice President for Administration is now known as the office of the Senior Vice President for Operations. This change comes as Brandi Jacobs-Jones takes over this senior vice president role.

Jacobs-Jones officially began her duties at the university May 12 while taking on the responsibilities of the office of the Senior Vice President for Administration. She believes that the new name for the office more clearly explains the office responsibilities.

"The renaming of the division from administration to operations better describes the mission and objectives pursued by our remarkable staff," Jacobs-Jones said.

It is the responsibility of the office to oversee the daily operations of many university services and departments. These services and departments include:

-  Physical Plant
-  Housing and Residence Life
-  Campus ID Card Office
-  Printing Services
-  Mail Services
-  Environmental Health and Safety
-  Purchasing
-  Food Services

"This rebranding will not diminish the high level of service that the students, alumni, faculty, staff and community have become accustomed to receiving by the institution," Jacobs-Jones said.

For more information contact the office of the Senior Vice President for Operations at (304) 696-2487 or by e-mail at mckenna5@marshall.edu.

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