FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday July 28, 2015
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Professor receives $350,000 National Science Foundation research grant

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday July 28, 2015
Contact: Megan Archer, Public Relations Specialist, College of Health Professions, (304) 488-8863

Speech and Hearing Center holds 'Tiny Talkers' programs for children with speech disorders

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday July 28, 2015
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Geohazards Technical Forum to address common transportation geological challenges shared by the Appalachian states

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Consultants, contractors and representatives of state and federal agencies involved with planning, monitoring, design and construction of transportation systems will gather at the Pullman Plaza Hotel in Huntington Tuesday-Thursday, Aug. 4-6, for the 15th annual technical forum called Geohazards Impacting Transportation in Appalachia.

The forum, hosted by the West Virginia Division of Highways and sponsored by the Marshall University Center for Environmental, Geotechnical, and Applied Sciences (CEGAS), is an opportunity for geotechnical professionals to share information and best practices, and collaborate on transportation related projects.  As in previous years, the 2015 forum will include a pre-conference field trip on Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2015.

"Federal, State and private entities that deal with the prevention and remediation of common geologic problems, such as rock falls on highways in the Appalachian Region, gain tremendous benefit by sharing best practices," said Dr. Tony Szwilski, director of Marshall University - CEGAS and forum chairman.

Topics for the 2015 forum include: dealing with emergency landslides; slope stability reinforcement, monitoring and repair, stream scour mitigation for bridges and impacts of underground mining on transportation infrastructure.

Vendors from across the country will be on hand to display some of their latest technologies.  Exhibitor space and sponsorship opportunities are still available. For the full technical program, registration and hotel information for the 2015 Annual Technical Forum on Geohazards Impacting Transportation in Appalachia, go to: http://www.marshall.edu/cegas/events/GITAR/

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday July 27, 2015
Contact: Sheanna M. Spence, Asst. Director of Alumni Affairs & Community Relations/School of Medicine, (304) 691-1639

Two local physicians join medical Alumni Association board

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. The Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine Alumni Association recently elected two local physicians to its board of directors.

Adam M. Franks, M.D., is a professor in the department of family & community health at the Marshall School of Medicine. After earning his medical degree from Marshall in 1999, Franks completed his residency at Marshall and a fellowship in surgical obstetrics at Advanced Maternal Care in Memphis, Tenn. He practices family medicine at Marshall University Medical Center and at Marshall Family Medicine in Lavalette.

Adrienne M. Mays, M.D., is an assistant professor in the department of family & community health at the Marshall School of Medicine. Mays earned her medical degree in 2009 and completed her residency, both at Marshall. She practices family medicine at Marshall University Medical Center. Mays serves as the medical director of the clinical skills lab and is the course director for Introduction to Clinical Skills and Advanced Clinical Skills at the School of Medicine.

"We are thrilled to welcome the enthusiasm that Drs. Franks and Mays bring to our medical alumni board," said Linda S. Holmes, executive director of the School of Medicine Alumni Association. "In 2015-2016, we're focusing on engagement and scholarships, so we're looking forward to the new ideas they will bring to the table."

The Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine Alumni Association helps connect and engage medical alumni from across the country with events and activities. The association is not a dues-based organization, but rather encourages alumni to direct those resources toward medical student scholarships.

Franks and Mays were each elected to serve a four-year term with the board of directors, effective July 1. 

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday July 24, 2015
Contact: Margie Phillips, Sustainability Manager, (304) 696-2992

Sustainability Department hosts Fresh Market Day each Wednesday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Sustainability Department is hosting its weekly Fresh Market Day from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. each Wednesday throughout the growing season in the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.
Produce is harvested from the Sustainability Gardens, as well as seedlings grown in Marshall's Greenhouse, and is shared with the campus community. The goal is to help nourish and educate.
Although it is free to receive the produce and plants, donations are greatly appreciated. MU's weekly Market Day serves university students, faculty and staff, as well as area residents. All are welcome to attend.
The next Fresh Market Day is Wednesday, July 29.
The MU Sustainability Gardens and the weekly Market Days are just a couple of the many projects of the Marshall University Sustainability Department. For more information, visit www.marshall.edu/sustainability and www.marshall.edu/musustainabilitygardens.
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday July 24, 2015
Contact: Leah Payne, Director Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine & Pharmacy, (304) 691-1713

School of Medicine welcomes 21 students for Project P.R.E.M.E.D.

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Twenty-one students from colleges and universities around the nation are scheduled to arrive Monday for the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine's Project P.R.E.M.E.D. (Providing Real World Experiences for future Marshall Educated Doctors).

The annual program allows undergraduate students of color to explore and experience the medical school during a five-day campus immersion visit that includes mock medical school interview sessions, robotic surgery demonstrations, suturing instruction, and discussions with current medical students and residents about life as a physician.

Shelvy L. Campbell, Ph.D., assistant dean of diversity at the School of Medicine, says the pipeline program gives students a real-life look at the processes of applying to and attending medical school.

"We are pleased to offer this program again at Marshall," she said. "Our diversity initiatives promote an inclusive environment by attracting, recruiting and retaining individuals who represent varying backgrounds.  Programs like this one help support our mission."

Campbell says students attending are from Furman University, Florida State University, University of Louisville, University of Kentucky, University of Missouri, Howard University, among others including Concord University and Marshall University.

For more information contact Campbell at 304-691-1607.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday July 22, 2015
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

School of Medicine receives $1.22 million to promote primary care

Department of Family and Community Health awarded grant
to develop innovative education and care methods

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. The department of family and community health at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine has received a five-year, $1.22 million grant from the federal government to develop ways to educate and train new physicians in novel methods of primary care, specifically geared toward the patient-centered medical home and its team approach to health care.

In announcing the grant, Joseph I. Shapiro, M.D., dean of the School of Medicine, praised Stephen M. Petrany, M.D., department chair, and his team in family medicine.

"Marshall has a long-standing track record of excellence in preparing family physicians," Shapiro said. "Steve Petrany and many others in the department of family and community health have put together an outstanding program for us. The awarding of this grant allows our school to grow its efforts in developing new and innovative ways to train medical residents and others health care professionals."

The competitive grant was awarded by the Health Resources and Services Administration.

"With this grant, we will be able to train doctors to direct the care of patients in an increasingly complex and sometimes impersonal health care system, particularly in rural and small-town communities," Petrany said. "We'll also be able to grow our efforts to collaborate with other health care professionals, including psychologists, pharmacists, social workers, nurses, and others, to provide cutting-edge medical care to our patients in a supportive and caring environment that continues to focus on the central doctor-patient relationship."

Petrany said the project will focus on family medicine residents in training, but will also include training of faculty and staff in support of those efforts, as well as continuing medical education for recent residency graduates and community primary care physicians.

Other members of the grant team are James B. Becker, M.D., senior associate dean for clinical affairs and associate professor in the department of family and community health, and Jennifer T. Plymale, associate dean for admissions and director of the Robert C. Byrd Center for Rural Health.�� Staff members on the team included Christy Adkins, Debbie Curry and Amber Vance, as well as research assistant Karl Shaver, who is an incoming member of the School of Medicine's Class of 2019.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday July 21, 2015
Contact: Sheanna Spence, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, 304-691-1639

New pediatric oncologist joins Marshall School of Medicine

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Paul Finch, M.D., a board-certified and fellowship-trained pediatric oncologist/hematologist, has joined the department of pediatrics at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine and the Edwards Comprehensive Cancer Center as an assistant professor.

Prior to joining Marshall, Finch most recently served as a pediatric hematology/oncology fellow at the Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC).

Finch earned his medical degree from Temple University School of Medicine. He completed a residency in pediatrics at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center/Le Bonheur Children's Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee. Finch has also served as a postdoctoral scholar at the University of Pittsburgh since 2013. His current research focuses on the growth and characteristics of ovarian cancer cells.

Finch is accepting new pediatric patients and referrals at the Edwards Comprehensive Cancer Center, located at 1400 Hal Greer Blvd., Huntington. For appointments, please call 304-399-6503.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday July 17, 2015
Contact: Leah Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, (304) 691-1713

Katherine J. Steele, M.D., chosen as July Resident of the Month

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Third-year family medicine resident physician Katherine J. Steele, M.D., has been selected as the July 2015 Resident of the Month, according to Paulette S. Wehner, M.D., vice dean for graduate medical education at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.
Steele was officially recognized at the family medicine grand rounds on Thursday.

"A major part of the resident's responsibility is to teach medical students and other residents," Wehner said. "Residents like Dr. Steele who excel at teaching will play a critical role in educating medical students and junior residents and getting them excited about a career in medicine.  The nomination submitted on Dr. Steele's behalf reiterates that her ability and enthusiasm to teach ultimately enhances the educational and clinical experience of both fellow residents and medical students."

In her nomination of Steele, Adrienne M. Mays, M.D., an assistant professor in the department of family and community health, praised Steele's excellence in providing clinical care in both inpatient and outpatient settings.

"Kate is a great resident that provides excellent care to her patients ... She is dedicated to being a good provider and as a faculty member, I always look forward to working with her.  As the faculty advisor for the family medicine interest group, I am aware that Kate also spends a lot of time working with the students and is always available to attend or host the student group."

Steele is a 2013 graduate of the Marshall University School of Medicine where she was recognized for community service with REACH Cabell County and Marshall Medical Outreach programs. Prior to medical school, Steele served in the Peace Corps in Mozambique and volunteered with Doctors without Borders.

As part of her recognition as the July Resident of the Month, she will receive items including a Certificate of Recognition and a designated parking spot.

-------------

Photo: Mitch Shaver, M.D. (left), director of the family medicine residency program, is pictured with Katherine Steele, M.D., the July Resident of the Month at the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine. 

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday July 17, 2015
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine & Pharmacy, (304) 691-1713

Research students receive NASA grants

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Four biomedical science Ph.D. students from the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine have received West Virginia Space Grant Consortium Graduate Research Fellowship grants to fund their continued dissertation research in a variety of disease-related areas.
Each student received a $12,000 grant from the NASA West Virginia Space Grant Consortium for their projects, which vary from the study of protein functions to metabolic diseases to growth factors in cancer cells. The awards are supplemented by the School of Medicine and each student must work closely with a faculty member to conduct his or her research.
"These students are conducting valuable research to help move modern medicine forward," said Richard Egleton, Ph.D., co-director of biomedical sciences at Marshall University. "Through these grants, both NASA and our institution help promote a dynamic environment for research among the next generation of researchers."
The student recipients are:
Deborah L. Amos, who is working in the lab of Nalini Santanam, Ph.D., will use her NASA grant to gain deeper insight into how exercise affects metabolic diseases, such as obesity, investigate the impact of exercise on lean/fat body mass and skeletal muscle function in a "stress less" mouse model and provide a means of improving skeletal muscle function and lean body mass.
Caroline A. Hunter, with the lab of Emine Koc, Ph.D., will use the grant to study the synthesis of protein functions in the mitochondria, metabolic syndrome and potential treatments that could prevent the development of these and related diseases.
Rachel A. Murphy, working with Monica Valentovic, Ph.D., will utilize the grant for her study: "Tenofovir Nephrotoxicity: A Mechanistic Study." Murphy will investigate how and why Tenofovir (a drug used to treat HIV) results in kidney toxicity.
Justin K. Tomblin, with the lab of Travis Salisbury, Ph.D., will use the grant to study how growth factors regulate the expression and activity of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor in breast cancer cells.
"I am honored to receive this grant. It is rewarding to know that NASA can see how my work can make a contribution in the prevention of diseases," Hunter said. "This is a great opportunity for me to have my work funded so I can make further achievements doing what I love--research."
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday July 16, 2015
Contact: Leah Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine & Pharmacy, (304) 691-1713

School of Pharmacy names Oklahoma scientist and educator to administrative position

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - M.O. Faruk Khan, M. Pharm, B. Pharm, Ph.D., M.B.A, chairman of the department of pharmaceutical sciences at the Southwestern Oklahoma State University College of Pharmacy, has been named chairman of the department of pharmaceutical sciences and research at the Marshall University School of Pharmacy, according to Kevin W. Yingling, R.Ph., M.D., dean of the school.
The appointment is effective Aug. 3.
"I'm encouraged and emboldened by Dr. Khan joining us here at Marshall," Yingling said. "He is a highly qualified researcher and educator who will be a great asset to our faculty and brings a wealth of experience in the education and research arenas."

Khan completed a doctorate in 1999 at the University of Manchester in England and post-doctoral research at the University of Mississippi. His area of research specialization is in medicinal chemistry and rational drug design, organic and peptide synthesis and enzymology. Khan also earned a master's in business administration from Southwestern Oklahoma State University.

Khan has more than 15 years of postdoctoral academic experience in teaching, research and service in pharmacy education. Prior to joining the faculty at Southwestern Oklahoma, he spent two years at the Florida A & M University College of Pharmacy.
Khan has published more than 50 scholarly research articles and has been the primary investigator on several grants. Additionally, he founded and served as coordinator of the Southwestern Oklahoma State University Center for Research in Pharmaceutical Sciences (SCRiPS) and was named the inaugural recipient of the Timmons Endowed Professorship at Southwestern.
Khan has created innovative exchange programs with several international institutions including the University of Dhaka, Bagladesh, and is working as a consultant for the Higher Education Quality Enhancement Project (of the World Bank) implemented by the University Grants Commission of Bangladesh.
"I am excited about this opportunity to collaborate with the existing outstanding leadership team of the school to lead a well-functioning team of pharmaceutical sciences faculties," Khan said. "Working together, we will be successful in fulfilling its mission to advance direct pharmacy patient care by developing innovative practitioners, researchers and educators, and thus to shape the future of pharmacy education."
Marshall University School of Pharmacy welcomed its first class in 2012 and will graduate its inaugural class in 2016.
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday July 10, 2015
Contact: Sheanna Spence, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, 304-691-1639

Marshall Health and the School of Medicine welcome new surgeons

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. The Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine welcomed two new surgeons to its clinical faculty July 1 in the Department of Surgery.

The new physicians are:

James C. Kitchen, M.D., a fellowship-trained vascular surgeon, who joins the Department of Surgery and the medical staff at Cabell Huntington Hospital. In 2008, Kitchen graduated from Marshall's School of Medicine where he was president of Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society, Beta Chapter.

While at Marshall, he also received the School of Medicine's Faculty Choice Award his senior year. Following graduation from medical school, Kitchen completed a general surgery residency at Marshall and then completed training in vascular surgery at Duke University in North Carolina. He is accepting new patients in the offices of Marshall Surgery, located at the Marshall University Medical Center. For appointments, please call 304-691-1200.

Nathaniel Seth Adkins, M.D., a fellowship-trained critical care surgeon, who also joins the Department of Surgery and the medical staff at Cabell Huntington Hospital. He earned his medical degree and completed residency training in general surgery, both at Marshall University. While in medical school, Adkins received the Homer Cummings Surgical Award.

Following the general surgery residency, Adkins completed a fellowship in critical care at Indiana University. He is accepting new patients in the offices of Marshall Surgery, located at the Marshall University Medical Center. For appointments, please call 304-691-1200.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday July 10, 2015
Contact: Megan Archer, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

Local health foods store, Crossfit Thunder join forces to raise money for Lose the Training Wheels summer camp

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -� Two local businesses committed to improving healthy lifestyles have joined together to raise money for Marshall University's 5th annual Lose the Training Wheels summer camp, which teaches children with special needs how to ride bicycles.

Butter It Up, a local health foods store and coffee shop, has four locations in Huntington, Barboursville, Hurricane and Charleston. Jeremy Mullins, the store's owner, said he has agreed to donate 10 percent of all store sales on Saturday, July 11, to go toward this amazing program.

"I have a passion for riding bikes and making our Tri-state community healthier," Mullins said. "We saw a need in our region to make this summer camp a possibility and we are happy to do what we can to help these children learn to ride and create healthy habits."

Mullins is also co-owner - with his partner, Andrew Leonhart - of Crossfit Thunder, a local gym that was established in 2009. Leonhart said Crossfit Thunder will hold a special workout at 11 a.m., Saturday, July 11, with an opportunity for members and non-members to donate toward the cause.

"We have programmed a workout which represents the amazing effort put forth by the children who participate in Lose the Training Wheels," Leonhart said. "This is not exclusive to members as we want to give all of our Huntington community a chance to experience what Crossfit Thunder has to offer while making a difference in the lives of many."

Leonhart said they have asked participants to donate a minimum of $5-10 to work out with all proceeds benefiting the Lose the Training Wheels camp.

Those interested in attending Crossfit Thunder's 11 a.m. fundraising workout can visit their Huntington location at 5th Ave #2516A, which is between Marshall's soccer stadium and the Cook Out restaurant. For more information on Butter It Up and its locations, visit them on Facebook or contact Mullins at 304-208-3742. To learn more about Marshall's Lose the Training Wheels program, visit www.marshall.edu/lttw online.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday July 9, 2015
Contact: Mary Thomasson, Marshall University Forensic Science Center, 304-691-8961

DNA technical leader presents success of novel project to review sexual assault cases at national conference

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Forensic Science Center DNA Technical Leader Jason Chute delivered a presentation about a successful pilot project to review and expedite sexual assault kit cases recently at the 12th Annual DNA Technical Workshop Bode West in Coronado, Calif.

Chute was asked to present at the conference because this approach to reviewing cases has never been taken before. The presentation provided an overview of the strategies, challenges and successes that were encountered during development and implementation of the novel project.

A few years ago, the Michigan State Police (MSP) was faced with addressing a backlog of over 8,000 sexual assault kits from Detroit that needed to be tested.

To start addressing the backlog, MUFSC's Forensic DNA Laboratory had previously worked with the MSP to provide assistance with the processing and DNA analysis of over 800 untested sexual assault kits for a project funded by the National Institute of Justice.

More recently, the MSP outsourced DNA testing of thousands of kits to private labs, and analytical reports from the cases needed to be reviewed.

To help expedite the review process of cases, the MSP approached MUFSC about participation in a pilot project to help complete reviews of the outsourced analytical data.

Over a one-year period, MUFSC completed reviews of about 2,400 cases tested by the private labs for MSP.

The project helped to expedite these cases for entry into CODIS (Combined DNA Index System).� A CODIS hit links either a DNA profile from a forensic case to another case or to an offender profile. These hits provide investigative leads for law enforcement officers to follow.

Chute called the project a win-win situation. "We provided Michigan State Police with a highly qualified and highly trained workforce to help review their cases, and we generated economic development for us," he said.

For more information about MUFSC's DNA testing review services, please contact Chute at 304-691-8946 or e-mail jchute@marshall.edu.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday July 8, 2015
Contact: Larry Crum, Assistant Director of Alumni Relations, 304-696-3134

Marco Cornhole Classic to debut Aug. 1

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A new event, featuring fun for the whole family and a spirited cornhole tournament, is coming to Marshall's Huntington campus on Saturday, Aug. 1.

The Marco Cornhole Classic and Marshall Family Fun Day, presented by Huntington Bank, will feature an afternoon of activities for Marshall alums, faculty, family and friends from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Harless Field, according to the Marshall University Alumni Association.

Designed to bring members of the Herd family together, the day will feature the Cornhole Classic tournament, which is open to everyone. Organizers say that there will be activities for children of all ages, which will include inflatables for multiple age groups, games and face painting. The event will also include music, food and free ice cream, in addition to visits from some familiar faces including Spiderman and Marco.

"We are very excited to bring the Marco Classic and Family Fun Day to Huntington," said Matt Hayes, executive director of alumni relations. "We are always looking for fun ways to get our alumni and Marshall supporters in the community out to enjoy a great time and get back on the Huntington campus. We hope people will bring their entire families out to enjoy a fun afternoon and some great food, courtesy of the Marshall University Alumni Association and Huntington Bank."

The cornhole tournament will feature a double elimination format and is open to players of all skill levels. Entry into the tournament is $20 per team, with prizes to the top three teams. Prizes will include trophies, custom Marshall cornhole boards and $200 worth of gift cards to the MU Bookstore.

The event is brought to participants by the MU Alumni Association, the Marshall Recreation Center, M&M Inflatables, Heroes 4 Higher, Stewart's Hot Dogs, Home City Ice, MU Bookstore, 93.7 The Dawg, Coca-Cola Bottling company and Dale Schobe.

For more information or to register for the cornhole tournament, please visit www.herdalum.com.

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