FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday April 24, 2015
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Five to be inducted into Marshall's College of Business Hall of Fame

HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - The induction ceremony for the 2015 Class of the Marshall University College of Business Hall of Fame will take place Monday, April 27, at the Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center.

A VIP reception will begin at 5:30 p.m., with the induction ceremony to start at 6:30 p.m.

The latest class of inductees includes:

  • J. Richard Damron Jr., former president and CEO of Home Diagnostics, Inc.
  • Calvin A. Kent, former vice president, Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER) at Marshall University and former dean of the College of Business, Marshall University
  • Paula George Tompkins, founder and CEO of ChannelNet
  • Janet Smith Vineyard, president  of the West Virginia Oil Marketers and Grocers Association (OMEGA)
  • Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, late president of Marshall University (posthumously)

Here is a brief look at each inductee:

J. Richard Damron Jr. is a senior executive with over 30 years of global and domestic experience with companies and corporate divisions ranging in size from start-up to $200 million revenue in health care, life sciences and financial sectors. He has a successful track record in both the public and private sector.

Damron was the President, Chief Executive Officer, and a board member of Home Diagnostic Inc. (Nipro Diagnostic) from February 2001 to March 2009.  He led the operational and financial reengineering of this manufacturer and marketer of diabetic testing systems, took the company through a successful IPO in 2006, and was named by Forbes magazine as one of the 200 Best Small Companies in 2008.  He has been employed in the medical products industry since 1980, in both operational and financial roles.

Prior to joining Home Diagnostics, he was a consultant and provided business and strategic planning to a variety of business and not-for-profit organizations.  He led negotiations and due diligence to expand distribution for a multi-national distributor of liquid storage systems, and managed the sale and due diligence of Home Diagnostics to a financial sponsor.  This led to his becoming the CEO of Home Diagnostics.

In 1996, Damron became Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Apollo Eye Group Inc.  He was responsible for SEC reporting and compliance, strategic planning, budgeting and financial management for the retail optical and vision care company.

He directed the integration of financial organization and reporting systems following a reverse merger with a publicly traded company. Damron developed job costing methodologies and negotiated contracts with managed care organizations focusing on reducing job costs, and enhancing managed care plan benefits which resulted in increased margins on capitated plans.

Other business affiliations include: Senior Vice President, Mergers and Acquisitions and Chief Financial Officer of Chiron Vision Corp, partner in the investment firm of Tullis Cook & Company, the Executive Vice President of Operations at Cooper Vision Cilco, Senior Manager at Hayflich & Steinberg, and Senior Accountant at Smart & McGinnis.

His community activities include: Member of the Corporate Board and Finance Committee at Boca Raton Regional Hospital; Past Commodore and Board of Governors at Royal Palm Yacht & County Club; and Elder, Co-Chair of HR Committee and Pastor Nominating Committee at Grace Presbyterian Church.

Damron earned a Bachelor of Business Administration degree in Accounting from Marshall University and is a CPA. While at Marshall, he was a member of Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity.

He resides in Boca Raton, Florida, with his wife, Pattie, who also earned her B.A. from Marshall in 1973.

Calvin A. Kent, Ph.D. AAS, retired in January from Marshall, where he had been a former dean of the College of Business, Vice President for Business and Economic Research and Director of the BB&T Center for American Capitalism.

Currently he is Distinguished Professor of Business Emeritus and Senior Economist at Marshall's Center for Business and Economic Research.

He came to Marshall University from Washington, D.C., where he was the administrator of the Energy Information Administration and Assistant Secretary for the Department of Energy during President George Herbert Walker Bush's administration.

For 12 years he held the Herman W. Lay Chair in Private Enterprise at Baylor University in Waco, Texas.  Before that he was professor of economics at the University of South Dakota and chief economist for the South Dakota Legislative Research Council.

He has been mayor or chair of the city council in three different cities, including Huntington. Kent is a former co-vice chair of Gov. Cecil Underwood's Fair Tax Commission and served as committee chair on Gov. Joe Manchin's Tax Modernization Committee.

He is a lay minister, Sunday school teacher, elder and choir member at First Presbyterian Church in Huntington.  Among his civic involvements are West Virginia Kids Count, West Virginia Public Health Institute, Hospice of Huntington, Municipal Development Authority and the West Virginia Property Tax Valuation and Training Commission. He is on the leadership council for the International Association of Assessing Officers.

He has taught in 14 different countries and at over 50 U.S. universities. He has been married for 52 years and has two daughters and six grandchildren.

Paula George Tompkins is a strategic visionary with a deep understanding of marketing and technology. Her 30-plus-year career encompasses the full spectrum of marketing, from direct mail and call centers to multi-channel and omnichannel experiences. She is an authority on leveraging digital touch points to drive store traffic. An inventor, Tompkins holds two U.S. patents for ChannelNet's SiteBuilderTM software technology.

She started her career as a commercial banker in 1974 with a stint on Wall Street at the Bank of New York. Abandoning Wall Street in 1975, she went on to break gender barriers at both 3M and General Electric (GE) industrial sales divisions as a sales engineer. At GE, she sold computer components to Silicon Valley companies.

One of her customers, a start-up, recruited her to assist with developing a personal computer, an early "luggable." She then moved on to another start-up, Altus Corporation, where she was responsible for creating an interactive electronic advertising medium for airline passengers.

In 1985, she founded The SoftAd Group, which was renamed ChannelNet in 2004. She has led the company's creation of thousands of multichannel marketing and sales solutions for corporate America. Over time, the solutions have evolved from 5 �" and 3 �" diskettes and early iterations of multimedia to CD-ROM and client/server technology, the Internet, tablets and other mobile devices.

Her technology-based sales, marketing and service company works in the finance, automotive and home improvement industries. Some of her customers are Fiserv, BMW Financial Services, Hyundai Motor Finance, Ally Financial, Inc., RouteOne, Toyota Financial Services Corporation, Harley Davidson, Ford Motor Company, JM Family Enterprises, Porsche Financial Services, Subaru, Jaguar, Land Rover, Volkswagen Credit, Lexus, Audi Financial Services, Kia Motor Finance, General Motors, Hunter Douglas and Benjamin Moore & Co.

The Marshall University alumna actively works to promote the school's programs. She has served on the university's foundation board of directors for 12 years.

In 2014, Marshall University's Yeager Leadership Institute presented Tompkins with the second annual William E. Willis Leadership Award for her exemplary leadership in three areas learning, guidance and honor.

She has appeared on television on Tom Peters' "Thriving on Chaos" and PBS' "The Nightly Business Report," and she has been on National Public Radio's "Money Talks." Tompkins also has been featured in numerous online and print publications, including American Banker, Automotive News, Auto Finance News, F&I Showroom, The Wall Street Journal, Fortune, Time, The Washington Post, Business Week, the New York Post, CIO, Advertising Age, Detroit News, Detroit Free Press, Crain's Business Detroit, J.D. Power and Associates publications, and Esquire.

Also renowned in the international business arena, Tompkins has been the focus of articles in a number of periodicals around the world, including La Tribune, Australian Ad News, Computer Sweden, Markedsf�ring and Japanese Newsweek.

Tompkins has lectured at Columbia University's School of Business, the University of California Berkeley's Haas School of Business, Stanford University and Marshall University.

Born and raised in Huntington, Tompkins holds a bachelor's in business administration from Marshall University. Her main residence is in the Silicon Valley area of California.

Janet Smith Vineyard worked for Ashland Oil Inc. for 15 years after graduating from Marshall University, dealing with the supply, transportation and sale of gasoline, diesel fuel and other petroleum products.

In July of 1993, she became the executive director of the West Virginia Petroleum Marketers Association (WVPMA) and West Virginia Association of Convenience Stores (WVACS).  Three years later, Vineyard led the merger of these two associations and the West Virginia Grocers Association to create the West Virginia Oil Marketers and Grocers Association Inc. (OMEGA) and was named president of the new organization.

In 2006, OMEGA entered into a joint venture with the West Virginia Trucking Association (WVTA).  In January 2013, OMEGA began managing the West Virginia Wholesalers Association (WVWA) and on Jan. 1, 2014, she and her staff took over management of the Independent Insurance Agents of West Virginia, Inc. (IIAWV).

In addition to her role with OMEGA, Vineyard acts as president of WVTA and executive director of WVWA, and CEO of IIAWV.  She promotes cooperation between the industries through the pursuit of their common interests and goals and by providing support and services to members.

For each organization, Vineyard and her staff work to promote and improve the business interest of the member companies by increasing awareness of the industries at the federal, state and local level; lobbying for passage of legislation favorable to the industries; sponsoring and promoting educational seminars, trade expos and conventions, as well as providing training resources to members; and above all, creating and maintaining higher standards and policing trade abuses within the industries.

Vineyard is the daughter of Charles and Wanda Smith, who reside in Nitro, West Virginia. She graduated from Nitro High School prior to entering Marshall University.  She has been married for 31 years to Gary Vineyard, and together they have one son, Craig, who resides in Huntington with his dog, Wink.  Gary Vineyard is from South Charleston and an electrical engineer from Virginia Tech.  He retired from Dow Chemical Company and currently works for Hewlett Packard.

Jan Vineyard holds an A.S. in Retailing, B.B.A. in Marketing and Transportation, and a M.B.A. from Marshall University.  While at Marshall, she was a member of Alpha Xi Delta Sorority.

Dr. Stephen J. Kopp began his presidency at Marshall University July 1, 2005. He passed away suddenly Dec. 17, 2014.

Under his leadership, Marshall experienced unprecedented growth and development. The strategic vision and priorities that guided Marshall under President Kopp's leadership stressed the importance of student success and developing the tools and resources required to advance this success. The Marshall Commitment, an 11-element action plan for advancing academic quality at Marshall, expressed and embodied this action agenda.

During Kopp's presidency, more than $300 million in new buildings and building renovations were completed or begun, remaining in progress today. These projects include the $56 million Arthur Weisberg Family Applied Engineering Complex, the downtown Visual Arts Center, the Veterans Memorial Soccer Complex, and a three-building indoor practice complex, which includes an indoor practice facility, student-athlete academic center and the Sports Medicine Translational Research Center.

Marshall's academic profile grew dramatically with new high-demand majors and degree programs, including digital forensics and the new schools of pharmacy, physical therapy and public health. Under Kopp's leadership, the four-year undergraduate engineering program was re-established and is now fully accredited.

External funding for research doubled and a $30 million research endowment was established at Marshall, following the successful mini-campaign to raise $15 million in private gifts. President Kopp was the architect for the West Virginia Research Trust Fund legislation, which matched dollar-for-dollar the private gifts to Marshall in support of research.

Additionally, during his tenure, Marshall became a leading university for advanced, high-performance computing and Internet-2 connectivity. The evolution of this platform has positioned Marshall University to partner and compete globally anytime, anywhere with anyone at any level.

Marshall University continues to excel as the nation's leading, accredited graduate DNA forensics program and has added to it the only accredited digital forensics program in the world.

In response to the needs of local, state and federal intelligence and law-enforcement communities, the university launched an undergraduate major in digital forensics. In conjunction with these developments, the Rahall Transportation Institute at Marshall has advanced to become one of the top university transportation centers in the country.

Besides its continued progress in infrastructure development and academic innovation, Marshall has also grown in enrollment and in the geographic area it serves. Under Kopp's guidance, Marshall welcomed the largest freshman classes in its 175-year history and undertook a groundbreaking initiative in international student recruitment.

Dr. and Mrs. (Jane) Kopp were always proud to call West Virginia home and quickly became endeared with the people and beauty of Huntington. Kopp was honored by Create Huntington for his efforts to help improve the livability of Huntington and his counsel was frequently sought for his candid and thoughtful approach to business and community matters.

He lent his expertise to a variety of area economic development organizations, including the Huntington Area Development Council and the Huntington Regional Chamber of Commerce. He was a member of Johnson Memorial United Methodist Church and the Rotary Club, and was a contributor to local charity fundraising efforts.

Kopp had a true appreciation for the arts and recognized their importance in building a strong and vibrant community. His support helped make possible the Old Main Corridor and Fourth Avenue beautification projects. Kopp led Marshall through the purchase of the former Stone & Thomas building, which has become a downtown visual arts center and an anchor of the new city landscape, bringing Marshall and downtown Huntington closer together.

In addition, President Kopp proudly lined the president's office suite with student artwork - hand-picked to highlight the immense artistic talent he saw in the Marshall community.

Kopp regularly visited area high schools to instill in students the importance of not just starting college, but completing their degrees, if they expected to compete in the global marketplace. He was a champion for raising educational standards because he strongly believed Marshall students to be capable of higher-level achievement.

President Kopp joined Marshall following leadership positions with Midwestern University, Central Michigan University and Ohio University. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in biology from the University of Notre Dame, and his Ph.D. in Physiology and Biophysics from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

He served as a postdoctoral fellow at the St. Louis University Medical Center, and a research fellow and NIH Fellow in the department of biochemistry at the University of Illinois at Chicago prior to joining the faculty of Midwestern University.

Direct Link to This Release
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday April 23, 2015
Contact: Sheanna M. Spence, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, 304-691-1639

Local doctors establish scholarship with School of Medicine

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Subhash Kumar, M.D., a Huntington nephrologist at Kumar Nephrology & Hypertension, and his wife, Rashmi Kumar, M.D., a Huntington psychiatrist, have established an endowed scholarship with the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.

The scholarship is for first-year medical students at Marshall with strong academic backgrounds and financial need. First preference for The Drs. Subhash and Rashmi Kumar Scholarship will be given to a student scoring a 36 or higher on the MCAT and with an income of less than $60,000. Second preference will be given to a student who scored 32-35 on the MCAT and who has an income of less than $60,000. The award is renewable for three additional years pending normal academic progress.

"We've been here 33 years, and it's been a happy and blessed time for us. What we have achieved has only been possible because of the Huntington community," said Subhash Kumar. "I thought it was only fitting that we give something back to the community that has given so much to us."

The Kumars came to Huntington in 1982 after Subhash completed his fellowship with the University of Massachusetts. During the 1980s, Rashmi also completed part of her residency program at Marshall and then served as a part-time faculty member with the School of Medicine.

"We decided that, based on our history with Marshall, we wanted to help its future," said Rashmi Kumar. "We just have an interlaced connection with Marshall and would like to see it continue to flourish."

Over the years, Subhash Kumar has served as a volunteer faculty member, hosting residents and medical student rotations. Rashmi Kumar looks forward to working with Marshall Psychiatry as it welcomes its first class of residents in July.

"Subhash and Rashmi have been long-time supporters of the School of Medicine in so many ways. The creation and future support of their scholarship is a true reflection of that," said Linda S. Holmes, director of development and alumni affairs for the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine. "I am personally and professionally thankful for their generosity."

For more information on the scholarships or to make a gift to the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, please contact Holmes at 304-691-1711 or go to www.musom.marshall.edu/alumni.

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Photo: Subhash Kumar, M.D. (left), and Rashmi Kumar, M.D., (right), both of Huntington, are pictured with Linda S. Holmes (center), director of development and alumni affairs for the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.

Direct Link to This Release
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday April 23, 2015
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Healthy Herd Youth Camps feature 10 percent discount until May 1

HUNTINGTON, W. Va. The Marshall Recreation Center will host the 2015 Healthy Herd Youth Camps beginning May 26 and running through Aug. 7.

Early-bird registration, which runs until May 1, allows parents to save 10 percent on the cost until that date.

The camps will run weekly with two different age groups: ages 5-10 (Little Marcos) and ages 11-15 (Future Herd).

Each weekly camp will feature a different theme, with different activities tailored to the theme. Some of the themes include Aloha Summer, Imaginarium Outdoor, Operation Splash Down and MU Olympics.

Early-bird weekly prices are $99 for members and $121.50 for non-members. Regular registration prices are $110 for members and $135 for non-members.

Each day of camp runs from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Before- and after-care are available if needed. Care is free for members and $10 per day for non-members.

Registration and health history forms can be found at the membership service desk in the Marshall Recreation Center or at www.marshallcampusrec.com. All forms must be completely filled out before campers may attend.

For camp descriptions and more information, please visit www.marshallcampusrec.com or contact Alex Boyer at boyer3@marshall.edu

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday April 23, 2015
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Engineering professor receives Outstanding Faculty Award

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University has named Dr. Andrew P. Nichols, associate professor of engineering in the College of Information Technology and Engineering, as the Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award winner for 2014-2015.

Nichols will receive $5,000 through a grant from Charles B. and Mary Jo Locke Hedrick. The award is named in honor of Charles Hedrick's father, Charles E. Hedrick, a former history professor and later chairman of the Graduate Council, and one of the founders of Marshall's graduate program.

The university's Center for Teaching and Learning announced the Hedrick Award and two others honoring faculty members. The other awards include:

Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award - Dr. Isaac W. Wait, associate professor of engineering in the College of Information Technology and Engineering

Pickens-Queen Teacher Award - Dr. Lori Howard, assistant professor of special education in the College of Education and Professional Development; and Dr. Dawn M. Howerton, assistant professor of psychology, and Dr. Rachael Peckham, assistant professor of English, both in the College of Liberal Arts

Here is a brief look at the awards and the winners:

Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award

This award recognizes a full-time, tenured or tenure-track faculty member who has a minimum of seven years teaching experience at Marshall and a record of outstanding classroom teaching, scholarship, research and creative activities.


Dr. Andrew P. Nichols has been teaching engineering at Marshall since August 2007, when he was hired as an assistant professor. He currently is program director with the Nick J. Rahall II Appalachian Transportation Institute's Intelligent Transportation Systems, a position he has held since April 2011.

Nichols earned his bachelor of science degree in civil engineering in May 2000 from West Virginia University; his master of science degree in civil engineering in December 2001 from Purdue University; and his doctorate in civil engineering in May 2004, also from Purdue.

Just how respected is Nichols among his colleagues?

"He is an extremely valued member of our engineering faculty," said Dr. Richard F. McCormick, a recently retired professor of engineering at Marshall. "He is the one faculty member who is held up to us all as being an example of an outstanding teacher as well as an outstanding researcher. Our dean, Dr. Wael Zatar, refers to the 'Dr. Andrew Nichols model' when discussing expectations with our younger faculty members."

Nichols says his teaching philosophy is "to deliver course content and create assignments in a way that leads to student engagement and students learning. That environment tends to involve hands-on activities, real-world examples and classroom discussions to promote critical thought."

He is both an applied researcher and a consultant in the area of transportation engineering.

"So, most of the work that I do is hands-on in the sense that it gets implemented on the roadway, affecting motorists every day," he said. "I can't design a solution to a traffic problem for example, a congested intersection without going to the field to see how drivers are performing and determining what is causing the congestion.

"Likewise, I don't know if the solution implemented is working until I observe it in the field. Due to my background, it is quite easy for me to incorporate these experiences in the classroom so that the students get a feel for the real-world scenarios they might deal with. I also try to incorporate real-world problems in homework problems and class projects."

Nichols grew up in Point Pleasant. After entering academia, he always wanted to return close to home to help educate students in the Appalachian region. He says he assumed that would be at Ohio University, West Virginia University Tech or West Virginia University, since there were not any other engineering programs closer.

"Fortunately, Marshall brought back engineering, which provided the ideal situation," he said. "As a young faculty member, it is exciting to see new buildings being constructed and� enrollments trending up. There aren't many places where you can truly have an influence on a program because they are either established or have many faculty members. I look forward to spending the rest of my career at Marshall University to educate the students of West Virginia and the Tri-State area."

Dr. Asad Salem, chair of the Weisberg Division of Engineering and Nichols' supervisor, says the types of projects Nichols works on are application-oriented and typically deal with technologies and management strategies that affect motorists every day.

"The prime example is the management of the traffic signal system in Huntington, which is now performing at a much higher level since his research group has taken it over," Salem said.

Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award

This award includes a $3,000 stipend. All tenured or tenure-track faculty members at or above the rank of assistant professor who have six or more years of teaching experience, at least three of which are at Marshall, are eligible.


Dr. Isaac W. Wait has been teaching at Marshall since 2009, when he was hired as an assistant professor. He was promoted to associate professor in 2011. Wait received his bachelor of science in civil engineering in 2000 and his master of science in civil engineering in 2001, both from Brigham Young University; and his doctorate in civil engineering in 2005 from Purdue University.

Wait says he has learned a lot about the need for a "personal touch" in teaching over the past few years.

"When I just finished my Ph.D. and entered the teaching profession for the first time, I would have told you that the most important thing engineering students need is well-organized content delivered in a clear and sequential manner," Wait said. "After 10 years, however, I have come to realize the critical importance of personal connections in supporting the learning experience.

"Even analytical, logic-oriented engineers can benefit from the influential 'soft' factors such as an engineering discussion with an instructor after a difficult exam, an in-class learning activity where they partner with another student and make a new friend, or meeting the neighborhood residents who will be personally affected by the design project a student is working on. Engineering education benefits when there is a personal touch in the process."

About Wait, Dr. William E. Pierson, professor and former chair of the Weisberg Division of Engineering, said, "From my personal observations as a colleague and during my time as division chair, I know that Dr. Wait has earned the respect and appreciation of other engineering faculty, engineering students and the administration of the college. Dr. Wait is not only energetic and enthusiastic, he is inventive and resourceful in his efforts to improve teaching and to provide an enriching learning environment for his students."

Pierson also shared the following quotes from some of Dr. Wait's students:

One student said, "Dr. Wait is an outstanding teacher. He wants his students to learn but he also wants to push them to work hard. He knows they are capable and seeks to show students just how capable they are. My favorite thing about Dr. Wait is how he gives more freedom to students in their work."

Wait says he does his best to push students beyond their comfort zone, while creating a learning experience that is both rigorous and demanding.

"And yet, students don't seem to resent being pushed, which makes me very happy," he said.

Pickens-Queen Teacher Award

Each of these three award winners receives a $1,000 stipend. The award honors outstanding junior faculty. All faculty members teaching on a full-time, tenured or tenure-track appointment, who are at the instructor or assistant professor rank and who have completed one to five years of service at Marshall are eligible.


Dr. Lori Howard came to Marshall in August 2012, when she was hired as an assistant professor, a position she still holds today. Previously, Howard was an adjunct instructor/university supervisor at the University of Virginia's Curry School of Education.

She earned her bachelor's degree in communication disorders in 1982 from the University of the Pacific; her master's degree in audiology in 1985 from Northern Colorado University; and her doctorate in educational psychology in 2001 from the University of Virginia.

"To the benefit of all of us, Dr. Howard's expertise as a teacher extends beyond her classroom and students," said Dr. Lisa Heaton, professor of elementary and secondary education.

One example of her excelling beyond the classroom, Heaton noted, is Howard's depth of knowledge during grant-related collaborations.

When asked how has she learned from experience and evolved as a teacher, Howard said, "At the risk of sounding like a greeting card or a poorly written self-help book, what I have learned through self-reflection is how profound the simplest concepts can be when teaching. These include: knowing our learners, seeking help from others, remembering I do not know everything, and setting high expectations for students. Most importantly, always be kind to yourself and others."


Dr. Dawn M. Howerton has been at Marshall since 2012, when she was hired as an assistant professor, which is her current position.

Howerton earned both her bachelor's (2004) and master's (2007) degrees in psychology from California State University and her doctorate in experimental psychology in 2012 from the University of Tennessee.

Howerton said she strives to help her students master three major skills in her courses.

"One, development of active learning and critical thinking; two, development of an appreciation for diversity; and, three, application of psychology to social issues and real-world problems," she said.

"My work is informed by the social psychology of attitudes and prejudice, the psychology of women and gender, and legal principles pertaining to these areas," she added.

Howerton says she recently has become interested in the role that ambivalent sexism and aversive racism play in the allocation of health care to women and minorities.

Dr. Marianna Footo-Linz, chair of the Department of Psychology, describes Howerton as an "invested teacher who truly believes in her students."

"Her eyes light up when she talks about those moments when things click," Footo-Linz said, "when they [students] take the lesson beyond the classroom and apply it to their lives or become active in a cause."


Dr. Rachael Peckham has been at Marshall since 2009. Previously, she was a graduate teaching assistant at Ohio University from 2004 to 2009.

She earned her bachelor's degree in English literature and creative writing in 2002 from Hope College; her master's in creative writing: creative nonfiction in 2004 from Georgia College & State University; and her doctorate, also in creative writing: creative nonfiction, in 2009 from Ohio University.

Dr. Kelli Prejean, an associate professor of English, observed Peckham's English 652 Special Topics course, The Creative Writing Market: Studies and Contemporary Practice in Multiple Genres, in October 2012. She described Peckham's class as "structured, yet student-centered," with a nature that "reveals her efforts to provide courses that professionalize our students and help them publicize their creative works."

"She has an excellent rapport with students, and students obviously respect the creative and professional activities in which they are engaged," Prejean said.

Peckham acknowledged that her writing classroom is structured "around collaboration."

"As a creative writer, I can't help but borrow from the best arts of the workshop model namely, the diverse feedback and the access it grants the student to a broad readership," Peckham said. "Given this close collaboration, it is crucial that my classroom be a 'safe space' in which sensitivity is exercised and expression protected. My creative writing students, in particular, are given carte blanche to write on any subject, as long as a burning curiosity or question propels them to the page."

Direct Link to This Release
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday April 22, 2015
Contact: Barbara Maynard, College of Education and Professional Development, 304-696-2945

June Harless Center to offer summer camps

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The June Harless Center for Rural Educational Research and Development, part of the College of Education at Marshall University, is offering summer camps on Marshall's Huntington campus for students entering 3rd through 8th grade. 
The theme for the camps this year is Exploring S.T.E.A.M. (Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts and Mathematics).   Links to register for either camp can be found on the June Harless Center Facebook page.
Two weeks of camps will be offered for children:
ARTS AND BOTS: EXPLORING ROBOTICS AND THE ARTS! WHO:             Children entering 6th grade through 8th grade  WHEN:          Monday, June 8 - Thursday, June 11 WHERE:       Marshall's Huntington campus COST:            $175 per child
ARTS AND BOTS: EXPLORING ROBOTICS AND THE ARTS! WHO:             Children entering 3rd grade through 5th grade  WHEN:          Monday, June 22 - Thursday, June 25 WHERE:       Marshall's Huntington campus COST:            $175 per child
All camps will run from 9 a.m. to noon, Monday through Thursday, with a snack provided.  For more information regarding summer camps, please contact Barbara Maynard at bmayard@marshall.edu or 304-696-2945.

Direct Link to This Release
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday April 22, 2015
Contact: Barbara Maynard, College of Education and Professional Development, 304-696-2945

June Harless Center to offer summer camps

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The June Harless Center for Rural Educational Research and Development, part of the College of Education at Marshall University, is offering summer camps on Marshall's Huntington campus for students entering 3rd through 8th grade. 
The theme for the camps this year is Exploring S.T.E.A.M. (Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts and Mathematics).   Links to register for either camp can be found on the June Harless Center Facebook page.
Two weeks of camps will be offered for children:
ARTS AND BOTS: EXPLORING ROBOTICS AND THE ARTS! WHO:             Children entering 6th grade through 8th grade  WHEN:          Monday, June 8 - Thursday, June 11 WHERE:       Marshall's Huntington campus COST:            $175 per child
ARTS AND BOTS: EXPLORING ROBOTICS AND THE ARTS! WHO:             Children entering 3rd grade through 5th grade  WHEN:          Monday, June 22 - Thursday, June 25 WHERE:       Marshall's Huntington campus COST:            $175 per child
All camps will run from 9 a.m. to noon, Monday through Thursday, with a snack provided.  For more information regarding summer camps, please contact Barbara Maynard at bmayard@marshall.edu or 304-696-2945.

Direct Link to This Release
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday April 22, 2015
Contact: Beth Caruthers, College of Arts and Media, 304-696-3296

Choral Union to offer stand-alone performance

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Members of the Marshall University Choral Union will be performing alone for one night only, beginning at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, May 2, in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.

Hillary Herold, Marshall University senior and choral scholar in the union, said this is the first time in her six years that the Choral Union will be performing solo.

"Throughout the year we do large works in combination with University Choir and Chamber Choir, and we've done a couple of things with the West Virginia Symphony Orchestra and Chorus, as well," Herold said. "But this is really unique in that we'll be performing by ourselves."

More than 30 Marshall students and Tri-State community members have spent the past 12 weeks preparing the set of madrigals, Mozart's Coronation Mass (K. 317), and selections from Copland's Old American Songs for this performance.

Choral Union Director Dr. John W. Campbell was a director of college and university choirs for 25 years before joining Huntington's Fifth Avenue Baptist Church as full-time minister of music in August 2013.

For more information about the Choral Union, contact Campbell by phone at (859) 684-8392 or by e-mail at campbelljo@live.marshall.edu.

Direct Link to This Release
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday April 21, 2015
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall University and School of Medicine name inaugural class for accelerated B.S./M.D. program

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Marshall University and the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine announced today the selection of the inaugural class for the newly created accelerated B.S./M.D. program, which allows students to complete the requirements for both degrees in seven years.

The program is open to highly motivated West Virginia high school students who achieve a minimum ACT composite score of 30 (or equivalent SAT), an ACT math score of 27 (or equivalent SAT) , as well as a cumulative GPA of 3.75 on a 4.0 scale.  Other admission criteria include three letters of recommendation and an on-campus interview.

Students will begin in August 2015 as Marshall University freshmen and will be collaboratively guided throughout their undergraduate years by both an undergraduate adviser and a School of Medicine mentor to help ensure their success in the accelerated program.

The following individuals have been accepted into the new program:

-          Taylor G. Adkins, Barboursville, West Virginia, Cabell County
-          Madisen R. Burns, Huntington, West Virginia, Cabell County
-          Kaitlan S. Conn, Fort Gay, West Virginia, Wayne County
-          Deena Dahshan, Charleston, West Virginia, Kanawha County
-          Sarah Evans, Sandyville, West Virginia, Jackson County
-          Holly A. Farkosh, Ripley, West Virginia, Jackson County
-          Jacob R. Kilgore, Huntington, West Virginia, Wayne County
-          Cierra L. King, Williamstown, West Virginia, Wood County
-          Alexis P. Lester, Winfield, West Virginia, Putnam County
-          Jordan E. Ratcliff, Pritchard, West Virginia, Wayne County
-          Hannah A. Ray, Huntington, West Virginia, Wayne County
-          Dana L. Sharma, Huntington, West Virginia, Cabell County
-          Emily H. Short, Summersville, West Virginia, Nicholas County

Continuing requirements for the program include selecting biology as a major, maintaining a minimum overall GPA of 3.5, successfully completing at least 26 credit hours during each academic year, and participating in enrichment programs during the three years of the undergraduate portion of the program.

"I couldn't be happier we have launched this program at Marshall," said Joseph I. Shapiro, M.D., dean of the School of Medicine. "We all recognize that West Virginia needs more doctors. One of the ways we can make that happen is to develop programs that attract and retain our state's best and brightest students." 

Students who successfully complete the program requirements will matriculate directly into medical school.  They are not required to take the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT). Additionally, they will receive a tuition waiver for the medical school portion of the program.

Jennifer T. Plymale, associate dean for admissions at the School of Medicine, described the incoming students as exceptional.

"These students had a number of options to continue their education elsewhere, but chose Marshall," Plymale said. "It is our goal that these outstanding students will remain in the state to care for West Virginia's residents."

Charles C. Somerville, Ph.D., dean of the College of Science at Marshall, was part of the development team for the novel program.

"Dean Shapiro and Associate Dean Plymale deserve the credit for creating a very attractive program," Somerville said. "The B.S./M.D. program will bring highly talented students to Marshall University, shorten the time it takes for those students to begin practicing medicine in West Virginia, and allow them to complete their educations with limited debt.  It's a win for everyone involved, and we are very excited to be part of it."

For more information on Marshall University and the new accelerated B.S./ M.D. program, visit www.musom.marshall.edu.

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Tuesday April 21, 2015
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

ChannelNet CEO and founder Paula George Tompkins to speak at Marshall University's commencement

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Paula George Tompkins, a 1974 Marshall University alumna and CEO and founder of the digital marketing and sales firm ChannelNet, will deliver the commencement address to MU's undergraduates Saturday, May 9, at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena in downtown Huntington.

The ceremony, the first of two on the day, begins at 9 a.m. A ceremony for those students receiving advanced degrees starts at 2 p.m. at the arena.

Tompkins, who earned a Bachelor of Business Administration Degree from Marshall, grew up in Huntington and graduated from Huntington High School in 1970. She has titled her speech, "Life is a Journey," and plans to talk-in part-about how "a country girl" from Huntington was driven to start her own company.

"My goal is to tell them about my life's journey, so when they walk through those doors to the world that awaits them, they will understand that their adult life is indeed a journey and one over which they need to assume control," she said.

Interim President Gary G. White said he is thrilled that Tompkins has agreed to speak with the students and guests attending Marshall's 178th commencement.

"Paula has a very special story to tell," White said. "She is living proof that it doesn't matter where you come from or what your background is, if you have a college degree and the desire to succeed in the world, you CAN do it. Paula certainly did it. I am looking forward to hearing her tell us how."

After graduating from Marshall in 1974, Tompkins left Huntington and started her career as a commercial banker in 1974 with a stint on Wall Street at the Bank of New York. After leaving Wall Street in 1975, she went on to break gender barriers at both 3M and General Electric industrial sales divisions as a sales engineer. At GE, she sold computer components to Silicon Valley companies.

In 1985, she founded The SoftAd Group, which was renamed ChannelNet in 2004. She is an acknowledged pioneer in using personal technology to facilitate multichannel digital marketing and sales. In the past 30 years, she has helped hundreds of the world's leading companies use technology to sell their products and build customer relationships, with a client list that includes Toyota, Harley Davidson and Benjamin Moore Paints, as well as Hunter Douglas, BMW and Ally Bank.

Tompkins also is an inventor, holding two U.S. patents for ChannelNet's SiteBuilder internet software platform.

Under her guidance, ChannelNet received the 2010 Outstanding Achievement in Internet Advertising Award in the category Best Home Building Website.

As an expert in using technology to improve marketing and sales processes, Tompkins is a much sought-after resource for journalists and authors, and as a conference panelist and keynote speaker.

In her "spare" time, she actively works to promote Marshall's programs, having served on the university's foundation board of directors for 12 years.
In 2014, Marshall University's Yeager Leadership Institute presented Tompkins with the second annual William E. Willis Leadership Award for her exemplary leadership in three areas-learning, guidance and honor.

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Monday April 20, 2015
Contact: Megan Archer, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

Marshall to join West Virginia University to host second annual Stuttering U. camp June 25-27

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Stuttering is a complex disorder that involves much more than breaks or hesitations in speech, according to Marshall communication disorders professor and stuttering specialist Craig Coleman.

"Children can experience negative emotions or thoughts related to their stuttering. This can cause them to feel very different from their peers and lead to social avoidance," Coleman said. "Last year, we held the first annual Stuttering U. program designed to educate speech-language pathologists about stuttering, and empower children and families to manage stuttering effectively. Watching the changes in the children and families over the three days was awe-inspiring."

Coleman said participants of the Stuttering U. summer camp will have an opportunity to develop their own support networks, learn about stuttering and work on communication in many real-world settings.

The second annual Stuttering U. camp is geared toward children who stutter (7-18 years of age) and their families. At least one parent of the child must be present for the duration of the program. The three-day camp will be June 25-27 at Marshall University with a two-day continuing education session on June 23-24 for speech-language pathologists and students.� A second continuing education event will be held at West Virginia University on July 23-24.

"The program was a success for the children and their families as well as the speech-language pathologists and our students at Marshall. We are excited to continue partnering with West Virginia University to continue this important program," Coleman said.

Mary Weidner, a speech-language pathologist and a current doctoral student in the West Virginia University Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, said this is the only camp in the country that tailors educational programming to meet the needs of children who stutter, their families and professionals.

"We offer a very unique experience for those affected by stuttering in a fun, supportive environment," Weidner said. "We are planning many fun activities which will challenge campers to take risks and make lasting memories. We will hold true to our motto: "Be Brave. Be Amazing. Be U."

For more information on the 2015 Stuttering U. summer camp and how to register, contact Coleman at craig.coleman@marshall.edu or visit www.stutteringu.com online.

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Photos: (Above) Craig Coleman, stuttering specialist and a professor�in Marshall's Department of Communication Disorders, welcomes the 2014 campers to Stuttering U. For more information on the 2015 Stuttering U. camp, visit www.stutteringu.com. (Below) Campers from last year's Stuttering U. camp played the "Minute to Win It" competition where they had to get as many cotton balls into another bowl using only their Vaseline-covered noses. The competition was between children and parents in which teams earned points by completing challenging tasks and answering stuttering trivia questions.

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Friday April 17, 2015
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Nominations for 'Because of You' awards sought for miners' celebration

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Nominations for the "Because of You" awards are being sought for the 2015 Coal Miners' Celebration, which is scheduled for Thursday, Oct. 1, at Tamarack in Beckley.

Miners, community members and others connected with the state's coal mining industry will gather there once again to celebrate the past, present and future of coal mining in West Virginia with a reception and dinner.  According to organizers, the purpose of the annual event is to recognize those who play a role in the success of the state's mining enterprise.

Nominations for the "Because of You" awards are requested for outstanding individuals or groups that have made, or are making, significant contributions to selected sectors of the mining enterprise ecosystem.  The categories include The Homer Hickman Collier Award, Engineering Professional, Community Investment, Community Involvement, Safety Professional, Outstanding Innovation, Environmental Professional, Management Professional, Women in Mining, Educator of the Year and Champion for Coal.

Landau Eugene Murphy Jr., a native of Logan County, will be given a special Spirit of the Coalfields Award.  Murphy, the son of a coal miner, was the winner of the sixth season of "America's Got Talent" in 2011 and went on to record bestselling albums and perform before  enthusiastic crowds all over the country.

Nomination forms may be obtained by going to www.marshall.edu/cegas/events or http://www.facebook.com/WVMinersCelebration.   Nominations are due by June 1.

The Miners' Celebration is a cooperative effort of the Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences (CEGAS) at Marshall University, the National Coal Heritage Area, Strategic Solutions L.L C., the United Mine Workers of America, the West Virginia Coal Association and the West Virginia Division of Energy, Office of Coalfield Community Development.   Dr. Tony Szwilski, director of CEGAS, is chair of the planning committee.

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Thursday April 16, 2015
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Marshall University program teaching children with special needs reaches out to the community for additional funding

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - For the fifth consecutive year, Marshall University will host the Lose the Training Wheels program, which teaches children and adults with special needs how to independently ride two-wheel bicycles.

The camp is offered through a partnership between the nonprofit charity iCanShine and Marshall University.

However, without more help from the community, this life-changing program may cease to exist in our region, according to the program's director and university associate professor of kinesiology, Dr. Gregg Twietmeyer.

"We have an opportunity here as members of the Huntington community to make a difference in the lives of our youth," Twietmeyer said. "This program has improved the health and well-being of the Tri-State special needs community for the past four years and we hope to continue the tradition of teaching these riders the joys of riding a bike for many years to come. But the truth is, we need more help."

Due primarily to state and university budget cuts, Twietmeyer said he has been tasked with making the camp completely self-supporting. This is because university subsidies to support the program's budget are no longer possible. As a practical matter, this means finding over $10,000 each year to ensure the continued existence of the Lose the Training Wheels summer program.

"We are currently seeking sponsorships at all levels," Twietmeyer said. "We've always been primarily donor driven and the community support the last four years has been wonderful, but the truth is with the loss of a university financial support safety net, the camp's continued existence is threatened. We are reaching out to the community to hopefully build our donor base and secure the camp's future. Without a broader and deeper base of donors and sponsors, this will likely be the last year of the program."

Ron Swearingen of Ona, West Virginia, has enrolled his son, Trey, for the past two years. Swearingen said without the Lose the Training Wheels camp, Trey would not have the skills necessary to ride a bicycle, which he enjoys very much.

"Trey has a pervasive developmental disorder and with that comes some attention deficit issues that makes it difficult for him to concentrate on riding," Swearingen said. "The Lose the Training Wheels program does exactly what it promises. Before attending the camp, he couldn't even stay balanced on the bike�it's an amazing thing to see him grow and learn."

Interested individuals or businesses can donate time as a camp volunteer, money, or other resources such as bottled water, ice, lunches for staff, etc. All forms of help are greatly appreciated. Businesses or individuals who donate $500 or more will be included on the camp's T-shirt and camp website, according to Twietmeyer.

The 2015 Lose the Training Wheels camp will take place July 20-24 at Huntington High School. However, moving forward, the decision to host a camp in 2016 and beyond will depend upon how much money is raised to support the 2015 camp, and whether such fundraising indicates that the camp can continue long term without Marshall University's financial support.

Twietmeyer said those interested in contributing to the program can contact him via e-mail at twietmeyer@marshall.edu, by calling 304-696-2938 or visiting www.marshall.edu/lttw online. Details on volunteering can be found at� http://www.marshall.edu/lttw/Volunteer-Registration-Form15.pdf. Individual donations via credit card can be made at: http://www.marshall.edu/lttw/donate.asp.

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Photos: (Above)The LTTW program participants are children ages 8 and up, as well as teens and adults. These campers have a diagnosed disability such as autism, Down syndrome or cerebral palsy but are able to walk without assistive devices. (Below) Parents, teachers and therapists describe the results of the Lose the Training Wheels summer camp as incredible. Many of the participants have tried for years to learn to ride a bike without success. In one week, approximately 80 percent of LTTW participants will learn to ride a two-wheel bicycle.

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Thursday April 16, 2015
Contact: Cara Bailey, Coordinator of Yeager Society Outreach, 304-696-2474

Yeager program honors Gillette for his leadership

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. For Marshall alumnus and avid supporter Joe Gillette, success began in the form of a mop bucket and a recognized opportunity.

Speaking Friday, April 10, at the third annual Yeager Leadership Institute, Gillette told the crowd of Yeager Scholars, board members and guests about his rise from a dishwasher to an executive.

As a Marshall student, Gillette got a job at a pizza restaurant on Fifth Avenue to work his way through college. His duties included washing dishes and mopping the floors at the end of the day, when he noticed his supervisor siting down to look over the finances with a cold beer.�

"The guy who did the books drank the beer and the guy who didn't do the books mopped the floor, and I hated mopping the floor, "Gillette said.

A coworker's absence opened the door to learn the books, and Gillette seized it, beginning a fast-paced rise in business that saw him earn a vice-presidential position at age 30 with Pizza Hut, and become a division vice president for a Fortune 500 company (Wendy's) by age 40.

Gillette founded his own Wendy's franchise, Wen-Four Foods Inc., opening 16 restaurants over 15 years and remembering his alma mater along the way. He is a member of the Pathway of Prominence, having given more than $1 million to Marshall University. His generous gifts to Marshall made it possible to open the Joseph M. Gillette Welcome Center, named for his father.

In addition to his financial gifts, Gillette has been active with the Society of Yeager Scholars, serving as board president; the Marshall University Foundation, serving as chair; and the Marshall University Alumni Association. He also is a member of the Marshall College of Business Hall of Fame.

In recognition of his leadership and excellence, Gillette was named the recipient of the 2015 William E. Willis Leadership Award, given annually at the Yeager Leadership Institute.

"As the third recipient of this award, Joe has exemplified leadership in business, community service and philanthropy," said Rex Johnson, president of the Yeager Board of Directors. "Joe has demonstrated his dedication to Marshall University through his hard work and generosity, much to the benefit of Marshall Athletics, the Marshall Foundation and the Society of Yeager Scholars. Joe is a true Son of Marshall."

Paula George Tompkins, Marshall alumna and founder & CEO of the digital marketing and sales firm ChannelNet, received the Willis award in 2014, and presented Gillette with this year's award.

"Joe is one of the greatest guys I've ever met," Tompkins said during the award presentation. "He has quite a commitment to Marshall, and Joe, we can't thank you enough."

The Society of Yeager Scholars was the first group that received a significant donation from the Gillette family when they were able to give back to the university, Gillette said. The Yeager program, which provides a complete full-ride scholarship to several students a year, also has an endowment in the Gillette name.

"We have been passionate about the (Yeager) program for many years, and it is included in the legacy we want to leave," Gillette said. "My passion for this program has never waivered. We've given time and money to one of the premier programs of the university.

"This program and these kids need all of our help," Gillette said after he received the Willis award. "We need to give of ourselves and find other people to collaborate with."

In an event earlier that day, Gillette had the opportunity to address the Yeager scholars, board members and guests gathered for the Yeager Leadership Institute.

"There are opportunities. Take the time to recognize opportunities and take advantage of them," Gillette said, recalling his time mopping floors.

He encouraged the students gathered to continue learning and leading.

"Never stop being a student of leadership," he said. "Don't think you have to be the smartest person. I'm just smart enough to know how dumb I am. I recognize I need help. Seek people that can make you successful."

Gillette advised the students to save money, live within their means and avoid credit cards. He also encouraged students to take advantage of opportunities.

"When you have a seat at the table, take advantage of it," he said. "When you find things you care about, get involved in them."

The William E. Willis award is named in honor of Marshall alumnus William E. "Bill" Willis. Willis grew up in Huntington and attended Marshall after serving in the Army during World War II. He used his G.I. Bill benefits to pay for Harvard Law School. Willis works at Sullivan & Cromwell in New York, and was named partner in 1959. He was involved in numerous high-profile cases with the firm, where he continues as senior counsel.

Willis served as a past president of the Yeager Board of Directors and has generously donated to the university. Marshall conferred a Doctor of Humane Letters degree on Willis in 1997.

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Photo: Paula George Tompkins (left) presents Joe Gillette with the 2015 William E. Willis Leadership Award during the third annual Yeager Leadership Institute banquet on Friday, April 10. Gillette received the award from the Society of Yeager Scholars for his leadership in business, community service and philanthropy. Tompkins received the award in 2014. Photo courtesy of Bob Brammer.

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Thursday April 16, 2015
Contact: Pat Dickson, University Communications, 304-746-1971

More than 1,600 high school students expected to take part in SCORES Academic Festival Friday at MU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - More than 1,600 high school students from West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky will visit Marshall University's Huntington campus Friday, April 17, to participate in the 37th annual Search Committee on Recognizing Excellent Students (SCORES) Academic Festival.

SCORES is an academic competition that allows high school students to compete in different areas of study at Marshall.  This year 115 contests are being offered. The purpose of the event is to recognize academic excellence, create relationships with area high schools, show the importance of college attendance and recruit talented high school students.  Events are open to high school sophomores, juniors and seniors.

"The SCORES Academic Festival is an exciting event for not only the students, but for Marshall," said Sabrina Simpson, SCORES coordinator and assistant director of Marshall's office of recruitment.  "The festival provides students with exposure to the social activities found on campus, which are integral to students' education and growth.  The event is a great way for the university to not only recruit students, but allow them to visit a college campus and become familiar with the university community.  The program allows talented students the opportunity to showcase their academic achievements while interacting with Marshall faculty.  This is an exciting day focused on celebrating the unique talents that each student brings to the festival."

The awards ceremony begins at 3 p.m. in the Cam Henderson Center.  The top three winners in each contest will be awarded medals.  Trophies will be given to the top schools in each division.  In addition, top seniors who were nominated by their schools will be recognized.

"It's amazing to see the enthusiasm of the students when they're all assembled for the awards ceremony," said Beth Wolfe, Marshall's director of recruitment.  "Several of the schools have t-shirts made specifically for this event, and their creativity seems to always top the previous year's.  And then when you see the pride of the students as they accept their awards, it's truly one of my favorite moments of the year."

For more information, contact the recruitment office at 304-696-3646.

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Wednesday April 15, 2015
Contact: Megan Archer, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

2015 Research and Practice Day winners announced

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The second annual Research and Practice Day hosted by the Marshall University College of Health Professions took place last Friday, April 10, with awards presented to 10 students.

Dr. William Pewen, associate dean of research for the college, noted this annual event expanded to a full day and showcased 47 research and practice presentations. Dr. Michael Prewitt, dean of the college, presented awards for outstanding work in the following categories:
  • Undergraduate Practice (Tie): Monica Rahall, "Popliteal Artery Entrapment Syndrome in Athletes" / Tayler Aab and Meagan Mahaffey, "Music Therapy and Preoperative and Postoperative Anxiety in Surgical Patients"
  • Undergraduate Research: Ateeq Chaudhry, Kimberly Di, Erin Pemberton and Molly Weaver, "The Effect of Repeated Overhead Arm Motions on Scapular Kinematics and Subacromial Space Outlet Width"
  • Graduate Research: Adam Riffle, Zachary Fisher and Jared Matlick, "Benefits of Home versus Institution-based Physical Therapy Following Total Knee Replacement Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Intervention Studies"

For more information about Research and Practice Day, contact Pewen at pewen@marshall.edu or 304-696-3743.

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Photos: (Left) Monica Rahall, an undergraduate student in the college's School of Kinesiology, explains her work on the "Popliteal Artery Entrapment Syndrome in Athletes" to Dr. William Pewen. Rahall received one of the awards for Outstanding Practice Presentation in the undergraduate category. (Right) Ateeq Chaudhry shares his team's research on "The Effect of Repeated Overhead Arm Motions on Scapular Kinematics and Subacromial Space Outlet Width" with Dr. Girmay Berhie, director of the college's health informatics program. Chaudhry and his team received the award for Outstanding Research Presentation in an undergraduate category.

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