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Stories and Poems

This section is a collection of stories and poems written by famous writers like Shakespeare and Wordsworth as well as stories by our resident writer, Chris Rose. 

They are suitable for learners from Intermediate to Advanced level. 

  • Scarlett is twelve years old and is trying to understand the world around her. She asks questions about everything, all the time. She also says that she already knows five languages…

  • My friend is afraid of spiders. This isn’t very unusual; a lot of people are afraid of spiders. But my friend isn’t just afraid of spiders, she is totally, completely and utterly terrified of them….

  • Rudyard Kipling used to tell his daughter stories like "How did the camel get his hump?" The stories end with a poem as a summary. This one tells us why many people prefer dogs to cats.

  • Fausto Ruiz got off the boat at the port of the city where he had been born fifty years ago, and to which he had not returned for twenty years.

  • "O you shaggy-headed banyan tree standing on the bank of the pond, have you forgotten the little child, like the birds that have nested in your branches and left you?"

  • "But, She said, I suppose it wouldn't do For everyone to be the same now, Would it."

  • Have you ever done any extreme sports? Are you an adrenaline junkie? Read this story about one man facing his fear.

  • No

    Thomas Hood wrote at the start of the nineteenth century, but he sounds surprisingly modern. In this poem, Hood takes a look at winter in a cold, urban climate, expressed with a nice sense of humour.

  • Two people sit down to play a game. One is an old man who has spent all of his life playing this game, which is called Go. The other is a young woman. She has only been playing Go for three years.

  • Autumn (or "Fall" – AmEng) often arouses feelings of loss and melancholy. But to John Keats, we should celebrate the end of summer for the wonderful fruitfulness of nature about to decay.

  • Two people sit down to play a game. One is an old man who has spent all of his life playing this game, which is called Go. The other is a young woman. She has only been playing Go for three years.

  • My friend is afraid of spiders. This isn’t very unusual; a lot of people are afraid of spiders. But my friend isn’t just afraid of spiders, she is totally, completely and utterly terrified of them….

  • Anna Winter pulled on her Gucci sunglasses and sprayed herself with extra-strength mosquito repellent. How could she be an award-winning journalist if she had to stay in bad hotels and eat bad food?

  • This poem by Andrew Motion was inspired by a Thomas Jones painting in London's National Gallery in which Motion reflects upon the enduring value of artistic creation.

  • This famous poem by the great Scottish poet Robert Burns is regularly recited during celebrations throughout the world, whenever Haggis makes an appearance on the menu.

  • Alberto took one look at his new neighbours and knew that his life was going to get more difficult. There they were, two of them, as big and as noisy as their car, and smelly and stupid as well.

  • Danny Applewhite was developing into a rather arrogant young man. He was among the top five achievers at his school, but would he be smart enough to avoid being a fool on April 1st?

  • "O you shaggy-headed banyan tree standing on the bank of the pond, have you forgotten the little child, like the birds that have nested in your branches and left you?"

  • When James Milner lands a job in his uncle's bank he rides his luck for a while and even earns himself a huge bottle of vintage champagne for one transaction. But how long can his luck last?

  • Read synopses of some of the novels of Nobel prize winning writer, South African J.M. Coetzee, and then compare them.

  • Have you ever done any extreme sports? Are you an adrenaline junkie? Read this story about one man facing his fear.

  • I looked at my watch and saw that it was going backwards. “That’s OK” I was thinking. “If my watch is going backwards, then it means that it’s early, so I’m not late for work at all…” and then I woke up. Again.

  • "We are doing Chapter 6: Hobbies, I like doing..." Robert Seatter has been an English teacher, an actor and a journalist. This poem takes us into part of an English lesson for adult learners.

  • In this poem some words have been substituted by homophones - words with the same sound but different spelling. It proves that computer spelling checkers are not infallible!

  • '…That floats on high o'er vales and hills…' This famous poem by William Wordsworth (1770-1850) was inspired by the spring flower, the yellow or golden daffodil.

  • "But, She said, I suppose it wouldn't do For everyone to be the same now, Would it."

  • "Deep in the middle of the woods”, said my mother, “is the place where the King of the Pumpkins lives." A young boy and his cat try and find out what - if anything - is true about his mother's stories.

  • In this fable – written by Ralph Waldo Emerson, the American essayist, poet, and leader of the Transcendentalist movement – a squirrel and a mountain have an argument!

  • It is the 22nd century and the world is very different. With new technologies, people can have the bodies that they want. See what happens when Mr. Smith decides to change his body. 

  • No

    Thomas Hood wrote at the start of the nineteenth century, but he sounds surprisingly modern. In this poem, Hood takes a look at winter in a cold, urban climate, expressed with a nice sense of humour.

your comments

Hend idris
Egypt
Very nice but so diffecult
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canaan972
France
This year I will practice seriously with B.C
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ALLILI
Algeria
thank you
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