Veterinary Medicine News | University of Illinois

Veterinary Medicine News

Veterinary Medicine News

  • Jodi Flaws Photo by L. Brian Stauffer In studies of mice, comparative biosciences professor Jodi Flaws and her colleagues linked phthalate exposure during pregnancy to reproductive problems in parent and offspring, and to degradation of the function and structure of the ovaries.
    4/16/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Two studies in mice add to the evidence that the phthalate DEHP, a plasticizing agent used in auto upholstery, baby toys, building materials and many other consumer products, can undermine female reproductive health, in part by disrupting the growth and function of the ovaries.
  • In a study of mice, comparative biosciences professor Jodi Flaws and her colleagues linked BPA exposure during pregnancy to reproductive problems in the next three generations.
    4/15/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    When scientists exposed pregnant mice to levels of bisphenol A equivalent to those considered safe in humans, three generations of female mouse offspring experienced significant reproductive problems, including declines in fertility, sexual maturity and pregnancy success, the scientists report in the journal Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology.
  • University of Illinois chemistry professor Paul Hergenrother, left, and veterinary clinical medicine professor Timothy Fan tested an anti-cancer compound in pet dogs that will be used in human clinical trials.
    2/26/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    A new drug that prompts cancer cells to self-destruct while sparing healthy cells is now entering phase I clinical trials in humans. The drug, called PAC-1, first showed promise in the treatment of pet dogs with spontaneously occurring cancers, and is still in clinical trials in dogs with osteosarcoma.
  • Muskrats in central Illinois are being exposed to toxoplasmosis, a disease spread by cats.
    1/28/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    A new study of muskrats and minks in central Illinois indicates that toxoplasmosis, a disease spread by cats, is moving rapidly through the landscape and contaminating local waterways.
  • An interdisciplinary research team developed a new approach to treating endometriosis. The team includes, clockwise, from back left: molecular and integrative physiology professor Milan Bagchi, chemistry professor John Katzenellenbogen, visiting research scientist Ping Gong, molecular and integrative physiology professor Benita Katzenellenbogen, postdoctoral fellow Yiru Chen, research scientist Yuechao Zhao, and comparative biosciences professor CheMyong Ko.
    1/21/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Two new drug compounds – one of which has already proven useful in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis – appear to be effective in treating endometriosis, a disorder that, like MS, is driven by estrogen and inflammation, scientists report in Science Translational Medicine.

Text Only Options

Top of page


Text Only Options

Open the original version of this page.

Usablenet Assistive is a UsableNet product. Usablenet Assistive Main Page.