Life Sciences News | University of Illinois

Life Sciences News

Life Sciences News

  • University of Illinois graduate student Adam Ahlers, left, veterinary clinical medicine professor Mark Mitchell and their colleagues found toxoplasmosis in wild minks and muskrats in central Illinois.
    1/28/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    A new study of muskrats and minks in central Illinois indicates that toxoplasmosis, a disease spread by cats, is moving rapidly through the landscape and contaminating local waterways.
  • An interdisciplinary research team developed a new approach to treating endometriosis. The team includes, clockwise, from back left: molecular and integrative physiology professor Milan Bagchi, chemistry professor John Katzenellenbogen, visiting research scientist Ping Gong, molecular and integrative physiology professor Benita Katzenellenbogen, postdoctoral fellow Yiru Chen, research scientist Yuechao Zhao, and comparative biosciences professor CheMyong Ko.
    1/21/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Two new drug compounds – one of which has already proven useful in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis – appear to be effective in treating endometriosis, a disorder that, like MS, is driven by estrogen and inflammation, scientists report in Science Translational Medicine.
  • Psychology professor Andrei Cimpian and his colleagues found that the expectation that one must be brilliant to succeed in certain academic fields was associated with the underrepresentation of women in those fields.
    1/15/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    It isn’t that women don’t want to work long hours or can’t compete in highly selective fields, and it isn’t that they are less analytical than men, researchers report in a study of gender gaps in academia. It appears instead that women are underrepresented in academic fields whose practitioners put a lot of emphasis on the importance of being brilliant – a quality many people assume women lack.
  • A new study analyzed DNA from ancient dog remains from more than a dozen sites in North and South America.
    1/7/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    A new study suggests that dogs may have first successfully migrated to the Americas only about 10,000 years ago, thousands of years after the first human migrants crossed a land bridge from Siberia to North America.
  • Obesity and smoking add significantly to Americans' health care costs, researchers found, and the overall trend is upward.
    1/6/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    A new study finds that smokers and the obese ring up substantially higher annual health care costs than their nonsmoking, non-obese peers. The added costs are highest among women, non-Hispanic whites and older adults, the study reports.
  • Researchers have worked out the evolutionary relationships of dozens of bird species. The findings add to the evidence that some traits such as vocal learning or foot-propelled underwater diving evolved independently among different groups of birds.
    12/11/2014Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    An international effort involving more than 100 researchers, nine supercomputers and about 400 years of CPU time has yielded the most reliable avian tree of life yet produced, researchers report in the journal Science. The tree reflects the evolutionary relationships of 48 species of birds.

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