Health News | University of Illinois

Health News

Health News

  • University of Illinois kinesiology and community health professor Ruopeng An used U.S. national data to determine the nutritional effects of eating meals outside the home.
    7/1/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    When Americans go out to eat, either at a fast-food outlet or a full-service restaurant, they consume, on average, about 200 more calories a day than when they stay home for meals, a new study reports. They also take in more fat, saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium than those who prepare and eat their meals at home.
  • Researchers, from left, Ephantus Muturi, Allison Gardner and Brian Allan found that different types of leaf litter in water had different effects on the abundance of Culex pipiens mosquitoes, which can carry West Nile virus.
    7/1/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    A new study looks at how leaf litter in water influences the abundance of Culex pipiens mosquitoes, which can transmit West Nile virus to humans, domestic animals, birds and other wildlife.
  • University of Illinois veterinary clinical medicine professor Timothy Fan, pictured here with his dog, Ember, describes the advantages of testing potential cancer therapies on pet dogs with spontaneously occurring cancers.
    6/16/2015Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor writer Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor published by Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor
    Pet dogs may be humans’ best friends in a new arena of life: cancer treatment, said University of Illinois veterinary clinical medicine professor Timothy Fan. Physiological similarities between dogs and humans, and conserved genetics between some dog and human cancers, can allow pet dogs to serve as useful models for studying new cancer drugs, he said.
  • Websites geared toward older adults are providing this population with new opportunities to discuss and explore their sexuality, according to a netnography co-written by Liza Berdychevsky, a professor of recreation, sport and tourism.
    6/10/2015Sharita Forrest, Education Editor writer Sharita Forrest, Education Editor by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor published by Sharita Forrest, Education Editor
    Forget those ageist stereotypes that senior citizens have little interest in sex and are befuddled by technology. Many older adults are going online to dish about the joys of sex and swap advice about keeping their mojos working well into their twilight years, a new study found.
  • Illinois chemistry professor Martin Burke led a research team that found derivatives of a widely used but highly toxic antifungal drug. The new compounds are less toxic yet evade resistance.
    6/1/2015Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor writer Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor published by Liz Ahlberg, Physical Sciences Editor
    New compounds that specifically attack fungal infections without attacking human cells could transform treatment for such infections and point the way to targeted medicines that evade antibiotic resistance.

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