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Required Immunizations

The following text is a description of the disease and explanation for the required immunizations. If you have specific immunization questions please contact our office during business hours at (217) 206-6676 or e-mail us at HealthService@uis.edu . Our staff will be happy to answer any questions that you may have. Remember that immunization compliance is mandatory in Illinois.

Measles

Measles is a highly communicable, serious infection. Death follows measles in approximately 1 in 1000 reported cases. The risk of death is higher for adults verses children and infants. Measles during pregnancy increases the risk for spontaneous abortion, premature labor, and low birth weight. Because of outbreaks in COLLEGES AND OTHER SCHOOLS, the Centers for Disease Control’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices endorsed a TWO DOSE measles schedule for children and college student in 1989. For information on the immunization click here: MMR

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Mumps

Mumps generally is a self-limited disease, but complications can occur when it develops in adults. Meningeal inflammation can occur in 40 percent of the adult cases. Nerve deafness occurs in approximately 1 in 15,000 cases. Until 1987 the incidence of mumps decreased drastically. In 1987 the number of reported cases of mumps jumped from an average 2,982 cases to 13,000 cases. Although Mumps vaccine was licensed in 1967, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices and the American Academy of Pediatrics did not recommend these vaccines for routine use until 1977. This decision resulted in a cohort of teenagers and young adults who are INSUFFICIENTLY IMMUNIZED. Outbreaks in the mid-1980s occurred primarily among adolescents and young adults in high schools, COLLEGES, and in occupational settings. This is the second reason for the implementation of the TWO DOSE MMR schedule as stated above. For more information on MMR inoculation click here: MMR

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Rubella

Rubella was once a common childhood disease. A Rubella infection that occurs in early pregnancy, especially in the first trimester, may result in abortion, miscarriage, stillborn, or other congenital abnormalities. Thus, preventing fetal infection and consequent congenital rubella syndrome is the primary objective. For more information click here: MMR

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Adult Tetanus, Diphtheria and Pertussis

Almost all cases of of Tetanus occur in persons who never completed a primary immunization series, did not receive appropriate treatment for a tetanus-prone wound, or both. The overall case-fatality rate is approximately 31 percent. Boosters or Doses ARE REQUIRED every ten years in order to maintain the appropriate antibody levels.

Diphtheria is predominately a disease of adults. Serologic studies indicate that 62 percent of adults, 18-39 years of age, lack protective levels of circulating antitoxin against diphtheria. This is the main reason that the tetanus/diphtheria immunization is REQUIRED every ten years.

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Specific Reactions for Immunizations

MMR

For specific information on the immunizations below click on the link:

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Measles

Minor illness is not a contraindication to Measles vaccination. In persons with severe illness the Measles vaccination should be postponed until after recovery. Vaccination should not be given for the 14 days before and several months after a person has received immune globulin, whole blood, or other antibody containing blood products. Because of possible risk to developing fetuses Measles vaccine should not be given to pregnant women or women who are considering becoming pregnant. Persons with a history of anaphylactic reactions should contact the Campus Nurse BEFORE IMMUNIZATION. If you have any questions about the Mumps part of the MMR please contact (217) 206-6676 during normal business hours.

  • A fever greater than 103 degrees F can occur 5-12 after inoculation, and may last 1-2 days.
  • A rash might appear.

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Mumps

Vaccination should not be given for the 14 days before and several months after a person has received immune globulin, whole blood, or other antibody containing blood products. Because of possible risk to developing fetuses,Measles vaccine should not be given to pregnant women or women who are considering becoming pregnant. Women of child bearing age should have solid contraceptive measures for three months after receiving the mumps inoculation. Persons with a history of anaphylactic reactions should contact the Campus Nurse BEFORE IMMUNIZATION. If you have any questions about the mumps part of the MMR please contact (217) 206-6676 during normal business hours.

A rash might appear after innoculation.

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Rubella

Due to fetal risk rubella should not be given to women unless they are certain that they are not pregnant. Persons with a history of anaphylactic reactions to Rubella vaccine should contact the Campus Nurse BEFORE IMMUNIZATION. If you have any questions about the Rubella part of the MMR please contact (217) 206-6676 during normal business hours.

Allergic reactions have not been reported for Rubella. Rubella does contain Neomycin which some patients might be allergics.

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Adult Tetanus, Diptheria and Pertussis within the past 10 years

Persons with a history of anaphylactic reactions to Tetanus Toxoid should contact the Campus Nurse BEFORE IMMUNIZATION. If you have any questions please contact (217) 206-6676 during normal business hours.

  • Redness and swelling can occur after inoculation.
  • In rare cases anaphylactic reactions can occur.

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University of Illinois Springfield
One University Plaza
Springfield, Illinois 62703-5407
217-206-6600

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