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For Undergraduate Students

Academic Year: 2009 – 2010

Undergraduate Education

A student with a bachelor’s degree should be able to comprehend written and spoken communications – from simple narrative to scholarly exposition, novels, and poetry – and should be able to use and apply abstractions, principles, ideas, or theories to concrete situations. Content as well as form is important to a baccalaureate education. The student should have broad familiarity with the social sciences, humanities, sciences, mathematics, and oral and written communication. Through the Engaged Citizenship Common Experience, a distinctive feature of a UIS education, a student will have the opportunity to make a difference in the world by recognizing and practicing social responsibility and ethical decision-making, respecting diversity, valuing involvement, and distinguishing the possibilities and limitations of social change. The University of Illinois at Springfield encourages a special understanding of public affairs in the broadest and most humanistic sense.

Goals and learning outcomes for baccalaureate education

By emphasizing scholarship skills in the service of the public good, UIS prepares students for lifelong learning and engaged citizenship. UIS prepares students to discover, integrate, apply, and communicate knowledge for the benefit of individuals, families, and communities.

1. Discovery of Knowledge

UIS graduates should be information and communication technology literate, exhibiting a strong proficiency in locating, reflectively comprehending, and synthesizing appropriate college-level readings, toward the goal of knowledge creation.

Competencies include:

a. Reading baccalaureate-level materials effectively, reflecting comprehension and synthesis;

b. Exhibiting a knowledge of and ability to effectively locate, evaluate, interpret, and use information; and

c. Exhibiting a knowledge of and ability to use information and communication technologies.

2. Integration of Knowledge

UIS graduates should be able to evaluate and integrate information and concepts from multiple disciplines and perspectives.

Competencies include:

a. Engaging in critical thinking by analyzing, evaluating, and articulating a range of perspectives to solve problems through informed, rational, decision-making; and

b. Differentiating the approaches that underlie the search for knowledge in the arts, humanities, natural sciences, history, or social and behavioral sciences.

3. Application of Knowledge

UIS graduates should be able to apply knowledge to address meaningful problems and issues in the real world.

Competencies include:

a. Exhibiting a knowledge of and ability to use contemporary technologies;

b. Identifying, interpreting, and analyzing quantitatively presented material and solve mathematical problems; and

c. Constructing intellectual projects independently and work effectively in collaboration with others.

4. Communication of Knowledge

UIS graduates should be able to communicate knowledge and ideas effectively both orally and in writing.

Competencies include:

a. Expressing ideas, facts, and arguments in a written format that depicts competency in the use of syntax, organization, and style appropriate to the audience; and

b. Exhibiting effective oral communication skills, paying attention to content and audience.

5. Engaged Citizenship

UIS graduates should be able to engage in questioning and critical thinking that leads them to explore peoples, systems, values, and perspectives that are beyond their usual boundaries. Students should engage in active and integrative learning to become ethical, responsible, and engaged citizens in a democracy.

Competencies include:

a. Recognizing the social responsibility of the individual within a larger community;

b. Practicing awareness of and respect for the diversity of cultures and peoples in this country and in the world;

c. Reflecting on the ways involvement, leadership, and respect for community occur at the local, regional, national, or international levels;

d. Identifying how economic, political, and social systems operate now and have operated in the past;

e. Engaging in informed, rational, and ethical decision-making and action; and

f. Distinguishing the possibilities and limitations of social change.

General Requirements: Bachelor’s Degree

To earn a bachelor’s degree from UIS, students must fulfill the following requirements:

• Earn a minimum of 120 semester hours, including at least 48 hours earned at the upper-division level.

• Earn a minimum of 30 semester hours of credit in residence at UIS.

• Satisfy general education requirements through completion of the UIS General Education Curriculum (see below), the Capital Scholars Honors Program curriculum, completion of the Illinois Articulation Initiative General Education requirements, or completion of an Associate of Arts, Associate of Science, Associate of Arts and Science, or Associate of Arts in Teaching degree.

• Earn at least 13 semester hours in the Engaged Citizenship Common Experience (see below).

• Complete course work with a UIS institutional grade point average of at least 2.00 as well as an overall grade point average (including both institutional and transfer credit) of at least 2.00.

• Fulfill all requirements in a major.

• Complete and file a graduation contract and pay the mandatory graduation contract fee.

Minimum Academic Components & Credit Hours Required

General Education These requirements include course work in written and oral communication, mathematics, science, humanities, and behavioral and social sciences    37-42   
Major Program Requirements The number of required hours in this category depends on the specific major selected. For example, the B.S. in Chemistry requires 30 upper-division credit hours in the discipline, whereas the B.S. in Clinical Laboratory Sciences requires 59 upper-division credit hours in the discipline. Most degree majors at UIS require between 32 and 36 credit hours of program-specific, upper-division core and elective course work — see individual program information for specific majors.

Core & Elective Courses within the Major

29 to 61   
Engaged Citizenship Common Experience Categories for this set of core courses include U.S. Communities, Global Awareness, Engagement Experience, Elective, and Speakers Series    13   
General Electives These are courses taken to fulfill prerequisites for a degree major, requirements for a degree minor, or for student interest.    4 to 36   
Minimum Total Number of Credit Hours Required     120   

Time Limitation

All credit earned at UIS to be applied toward the completion of a bachelor’s degree must be taken within seven consecutive years of the first course taken at UIS in pursuit of that degree.

Undergraduate Admission

Undergraduate admission to the University of Illinois at Springfield includes first-time freshmen with fewer than 12 transferable semester hours; freshmen with between 12 and 29 transferable semester hours; and transfer students with more than 30 transferable semester hours at community colleges or other regionally accredited institutions of higher learning. In addition, the campus offers alternative admissions, a senior learners program, and special admission for students not seeking a degree. Each of these admission options is discussed in detail below, along with other important admission requirements. Write to the Office of Admissions, University of Illinois at Springfield, One University Plaza, MS UHB 1080, Springfield, IL 62703-5407, to request an application form, or apply online at www.uis.edu/admissions. The toll free number is (888) 977-4847.

Please note: Admission to UIS does not constitute entry into a particular degree program. Some programs have special entrance requirements; others have limited enrollments. Contact individual programs for specific information.

Freshmen Admission

The University of Illinois at Springfield seeks to enroll as Capital Scholars an academically well-qualified first year class of students who have pursued strong college preparatory curricula while in high school and demonstrated the ability to be successful in their pursuits, both academic and nonacademic. The best qualified of each year’s pool of applicants to UIS will be admitted as space permits. Priority consideration for admission will be given to students whose applications are completed and postmarked by the priority application date (March 15 prior to the fall semester in which the student wishes to enroll). Admissions decisions will be made, and official notifications mailed, on a rolling basis (biweekly timeline).

Applications will be evaluated on the following criteria:

College preparatory curricula and academic course work

Students should pursue rigorous and challenging college preparatory curricula. Grade trends and the rigor of courses completed throughout high school will be considered. Minimum academic course work requirements are:

• four years of academic English with emphasis on written and oral communication and literature

• three years of social studies with emphasis on history and government (additional acceptable courses include anthropology, economics, geography, philosophy, political science, psychology, and sociology)

• three years of college preparatory mathematics, selected from algebra, geometry, advanced algebra, pre-calculus, trigonometry, and calculus

• three years of laboratory science, selected from biology, chemistry, geology, physical science, astronomy, and physics

• two years of one foreign language or two years of fine arts, selected from art, music, dance, and theater

Standardized test scores, grade-point average, and class rank

The following credentials will be considered:

• class rank (if applicable)

• grade-point average

• ACT or SAT scores. UIS will consider ACT or SAT test scores that are posted on an official high school transcript (enclosed with the student’s application) or sent as a photocopy with the student’s application for determining admission.  Prior to the start of the semester, student must have official scores sent from the testing center. To have official scores reported to UIS from ACT, use UIS’ ACT institution code of 1137; for SAT, the code is 0834.

Personal Statement

Applicants must provide written evidence of their ability to perform at a high academic level by submitting personal and academic statements. These statements should address any circumstances (positive or negative) that may have affected the student’s high school experience and that are not readily apparent from academic records or standardized test scores. The personal statement should be viewed as an applicant’s opportunity to speak on his or her own behalf. The academic statement should discuss long term goals, intended major, or academic areas of interest.  Generally, the statements should be approximately 500 to 750 words and should reflect the student’s best work – structure, accuracy, and overall quality will be considered.

The Honors Program

The Honors Program is a selective program that emphasizes excellence and involvement. The Program currently enrolls approximately 100 freshmen each year in its living-learning community which is housed in the Lincoln Residence Hall. Freshmen and sophomores honors students are required to live in Lincoln Residence Hall.

Honors students participate in an interdisciplinary core curriculum designed to prepare them for their majors and foster the intellectual skills that society expects from future leaders. Honors interdisciplinary core courses introduce students to ideas from a range of disciplines, and help them integrate the insights of those disciplines to create new knowledge. Each course includes topics and draws on authors that reflect the ethnic, racial, and gender diversity of America, and also world-wide cultural diversity. Honors students participate in learning teams for many course assignments; their work together nurtures intellectual growth and engagement with the ideas of other. Collaboration also prepares honors students for the challenges of working in a complex and diverse society. The curriculum-wide focus on collaborative learning also emphasizes leadership.

Admission to the Honors Program is competitive and is based on an overall evaluation of high school course work, grade-point average, class rank, SAT or ACT scores, and the personal and academic statement. The personal and academic statement should address reasons for interest in the Honors Program, possible intellectual and career direction, and creative or leadership potential. A personal or telephone interview with a member of the admissions committee (made up of faculty and program representatives) may also be a component of the admission process. Students who want to apply to the Honors Program should indicate on their application for admission that they are interested in honors. For more information regarding the Capital Scholars Honors Program, potential students should visit the Capital Scholars Honors Program’s website (www.uis.edu/capitalscholars) or contact the Program directly by emailing cap@uis.edu or by calling (217) 206-7246.

Undergraduate Transfer Admission

Students other than Capital Scholars may be considered for admission to UIS as transfer students if they have earned at least 30 transferable semester hours (remedial or developmental courses are not accepted) from a regionally accredited institution. Those who have earned an Associate of Arts, an Associate of Science, an Associate of Arts and Science, or an Associate of Arts in Teaching degree from a regionally accredited Illinois community college or other regionally accredited institution may be admitted to UIS as a junior if they have a cumulative grade-point average of 2.00 or higher on a 4.00 scale.

Advanced standing as a senior may be granted to those who transfer with 30 semester hours of upper-division credit beyond the 60 hours required for junior status. Only transfer credit hours with a grade of C or better are acceptable for advanced standing. Students entering as seniors must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours at UIS and must complete all program and campus degree requirements to graduate.

Please contact the Office of Admissions regarding materials and criteria that are required for consideration for admission. The toll free number is (888) 977-4847. Potential students should visit the Office of Admissions’ website (www.uis.edu/admissions) for additional information.

Lower-division Courses Used for Degree Credit

Community college students can transfer up to 60 semester hours of credit to UIS. However, a community college transfer student may submit a Student Petition asking to have an additional 12 semester hours of lower-division credit used toward a bachelor’s degree if the student’s advisor, department chair, and dean approve. A grade of C or better must have been earned.

Students who have earned lower-division credit at UIS and would like to have that credit used for degree credit may do so with the approval of their advisor, a program representative, and the appropriate dean. A grade of C or better must have been earned.

Course work completed at community colleges and lower-division course work completed at four-year institutions will transfer to UIS as lower-division credit, even if the equivalent UIS course is offered as an upper-division course. Lower-division transfer course work will still satisfy general education requirements even though the equivalent UIS course is upper-division.

Community College Articulation and Transfer

Loss of credit that may occur when students transfer from other institutions to UIS can extend the time needed to complete the baccalaureate degree. By participation in the Illinois Articulation Initiative and development of two-plus-two agreements and other articulation agreements with community colleges and other institutions of higher education, UIS has made considerable efforts to ensure that students have the best chance of transferring in the maximum number of credit hours.

Students in most programs at UIS can earn a baccalaureate degree in two years beyond the Associate of Arts, Associate of Science, Associate of Arts and Science, and Associate of Arts in Teaching degree with no loss of credit earned. About one-third of UIS’ bachelor’s degree programs have no specific course requirements for entry. The remaining degree programs, however, do have certain prerequisites in place. Transfer guides for all Illinois community colleges are available in UIS’ Office of Admissions to help students plan their courses of study.

Many UIS undergraduate programs have also entered into articulation agreements (two-plus-two agreements) with academic programs at community colleges, making it easier for students to plan an entire four-year course of study while still enrolled at another institution. Interested students should contact the transfer center at their community college for additional information.

Illinois Articulation Initiative

The Illinois Articulation Initiative is a statewide agreement designed to allow students to transfer general education credit, as well as credit earned in select majors, between participating institutions. UIS has participated in IAI since the summer of 1998.

The IAI General Education Core Curriculum is a package of lower-division general education courses that can transfer from one participating school to another to fulfill the lower-division general education requirements. The core curriculum package consists of at least 12 to 13 courses (37 to 41 semester credits) in five fields or categories. Completion of the entire IAI General Education Core Curriculum satisfies lower-division general education requirements for a bachelor’s degree at UIS. Students may use one performing arts course to meet humanities lower division requirements, even though performance courses are not accepted by IAI.

UIS also participates in certain IAI Baccalaureate Majors Recommendations, which means that students may be able to transfer courses in the major between participating institutions without loss of credit. Contact an academic advisor for additional information or go to www.iTransfer.org.

Joint Admission Program and Partnership Agreements

The Joint Admission Program is limited to students who are pursuing an Associate of Arts, Associate of Science, Associate of Arts and Science, or Associate of Arts in Teaching degree, in compliance with the Illinois Articulation Agreement, and is not intended to replace the normal articulation agreements already existing between UIS and community colleges. Instead, it focuses on advising and socializing students to ease the transition between the two-year and four-year college. Students who choose to enter into a joint admission program with UIS are entitled to receive academic advising each semester from UIS, invitations to social and cultural activities, and financial assistance newsletters.

UIS currently has joint admission agreements with many Illinois community colleges and partnership agreements for UIS online programs with community colleges across the United States.

Alternative Admission

Alternative admission at the junior level is available for students who have a minimum of 12-15 years of life/work learning experience (beyond high school) that may be considered in lieu of traditional classroom learning acquired during the first and second years of college. The admissions committee provides individual assessments of an applicant’s eligibility based on a written narrative, three letters of recommendation, and demonstration of competency in the areas of general education. Official transcripts from all colleges or universities where credit was attempted or earned are required. Contact the Office of Admissions for additional information.

Admission for International Students seeking Bachelor’s Degrees

International students must meet all requirements for undergraduate admission. Additionally, international students will need to submit official TOEFL scores, or an equivalent exam approved by UIS, and documentation required for issuance of an I-20. International students seeking admission to the University of Illinois at Springfield are encouraged to apply as early as possible.

All students who are not U.S. citizens must take a tuberculin skin test or a Quantiferon Gold test at the Health Services Office upon their arrival to campus and before registration. There are no exceptions from the tuberculin skin test for students who are not citizens of the U.S. Students who have a positive tuberculin skin test will be required to have a chest x-ray. Students who have not obtained their chest x-ray 10 days (5 days for summer) from the date of the positive test will be administratively withdrawn from all classes.

Students who have been treated for tuberculosis or who have been treated because of a positive tuberculin skin test in the past must bring those medical records with them. All medical records must be accompanied by a certified English translation.

Non-degree Admission

Undergraduate non-degree seeking students are not required to file all documents necessary for admission to a degree program, but will be asked for clarification of their educational intent before exceeding 16 semester hours. Non-degree students are subject to the same academic probation and suspension policies as degree-seeking students.

Students who later choose to become degree candidates will be required to meet all admission requirements of their program. With the degree program’s approval, up to 16 semester hours taken as an undergraduate non-degree student may count toward the degree. Non-degree students are not eligible for financial assistance.

Online Student Admission

Students who choose to pursue their studies online should contact their intended academic program for information concerning admission requirements. A list of online degrees is available on the UIS website (www.uis.edu).

Senior Learner Admission

The Senior Learner Program is open to those individuals who are at least 62 years old by the relevant registration day. There are two options available.

For non-degree credit, individuals can attend courses on an audit basis and receive an activity card for a small fee, plus a parking fee. Senior learners are also responsible for all course-related fees, including online course fees. Please note that the senior learner fee is non-refundable on or after the official start date of the applicable semester. This option does not offer academic credit and does not require graded tests or papers. For more information, contact the Office of Records and Registration.

For degree credit, the Illinois Senior Citizen Courses Act (110 ILCS 990) permits Illinois senior citizens, over the age of 65, to enroll in regularly scheduled credit courses at UIS without the payment of tuition. This program allows individuals to earn undergraduate or graduate credit by paying only UIS fees; tuition is waived. You must be admitted as a degree seeking student to UIS and your annual household income must be below the threshold amount as indicated in the Illinois Cares Rx BASIC program. You must meet regular class expectations to earn academic credit. For more information, see the “Financial Assistance for ALL Students” section of the current catalog.

Financial Assistance for Undergraduate Students

The UIS Office of Financial Assistance coordinates federal, state, institutional, and private financial aid programs for all students. Assistance is available in the form of grants, tuition waivers, assistantships, scholarships, loans, part-time employment, and veterans’ benefits. For detailed information, see the “Financial Aid” section of the current catalog.

General Education Requirements

To ensure educational breadth, accredited U.S. institutions generally require completion of courses in several disciplines or areas – usually oral and written communication, mathematics, science, social science, and humanities. This constitutes the institution’s general education requirements.

General education is an important part of the distinctive UIS degree and consists of more than a series of distribution requirements. The UIS General Education Curriculum provides structure for the whole baccalaureate experience while allowing the flexibility transfer students need to enter the institution and the curriculum with ease. General education course work helps student achieve the goals and outcomes for baccalaureate education listed above. In certain cases, prerequisites or major requirements may be fulfilled by general education courses.

General education courses are usually 100- and 200-level offerings, and consist of the following categories (note: remedial and developmental courses do not count towards general education requirements):

Written Communication (2 courses, 4 hours each; courses must be passed with a grade of C or better; students who transfer to UIS with 30 or more hours may use 3-hour courses taken at other institutions to meet this requirement)

Oral Communication (1 course, 3 hours)

Math (2 courses, 3 hours each, one in math skills and one in applied math; students who transfer to UIS with 30 or more hours are responsible for only one 3-hour math course in either category)

Life and Physical Science (2 courses, 3 or 4 hours each, one in physical science and one in life science; one course must include a laboratory)

Humanities (3 courses, 3 hours each; one course should be from the visual, creative, or performing arts and at least one from other humanities; students enrolling as freshmen at UIS are responsible for one Comparative Societies Humanities course)

Behavioral and Social Sciences (3 courses, 3 hours each; courses must be taken in at least two disciplines; students enrolling as freshmen at UIS are responsible for one Comparative Societies Social Sciences course)

Students entering UIS as freshmen, with 0-29 hours of college credit, will take two Comparative Societies courses at the 100 level, one in the humanities and one in the behavioral and social sciences. Comparative Societies courses are designed to give students an idea of the historical complexity as well as the diversity of beliefs and practices in the human social experience.

Transfer students may satisfy general education requirements in one of three ways:

1. Complete the requirements of the Illinois Articulation Initiative Core Curriculum.

2. Graduates of Illinois community colleges holding an Associate of Arts, an Associate of Science, an Associate of Arts and Science, or an Associate of Arts in Teaching degree are considered to have met all UIS general education requirements.

3. Complete the requirements of the UIS General Education Curriculum. If a student satisfactorily completes the objectives of a General Education area but earns fewer hours than required in a particular category, the remaining hours for that area can be waived so long as the total transfer hours earned in a particular category are within one semester hour of the required total. However, students must complete the minimum of 12 courses and 37 semester hours. Fractional semester hours can also be waived, but the minimum requirements will still be enforced.

Transfer students in some degree programs may use a limited number (no more than 12 hours) of 300- or 400-level courses to meet general education requirements. Students should consult with faculty in their major for additional information. The 300- and 400-level courses used to meet general education requirements must be approved by the Office of Undergraduate Education. The current list of approved courses is available on the General Education website.

Test-Based Credit and Dual Enrollment

Students may fulfill general education requirements or major prerequisites by earning credit via the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP), Advanced Placement (AP) tests, the International Baccalaureate Program (IB), dual enrollment, and other approved substitutes, provided the credit meets UIS criteria for college-level work. A maximum of 30 semester hours of credit from test-based credit or dual enrollment may be applied toward degree requirements. For more information on using test-based credit and/or dual enrollment, students should contact the Undergraduate Academic Advising Center (uisuaac@uis.edu).

CLEP Credit

CLEP is designed to assist students in reaching their academic goals by gaining college credit for knowledge acquired through prior course work, job experience, internships, or other experiences outside a traditional classroom setting. CLEP exams are published and scored by the College Board. For further information, visit the College Board’s website at http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/clep/about.html. UIS students should consult with an academic advisor to find out which CLEP exams, if any, they may be eligible to take. See the table below for a list of the CLEP exams for which UIS grants credit.

CLEP EXAM

UIS Course

Minimum CLEP Score Required

Credit Hours

Composition

English Composition (with essay)

ENG 101 *

60

4

Freshman College Composition

ENG 102 *

60

4

Literature

American Literature

ENG 235

50

3

Analyzing and Interpreting Literature

ENG 237

50

3

English Literature

ENG 236

50

3

Business

Financial Accounting

ACC 211

65

3

Principles of Macroeconomics

ECO 201

60

3

Principles of Microeconomics

ECO 202

60

3

History and Social Sciences

American Government

POS 201

50

3

Introductory Psychology

PSY 201

50

3

Introductory Sociology

SOA 101

50

3

U.S. History I: Early Colonization to 1877

HIS 203

50

3

U.S. History II: 1865 to the Present

HIS 203

50

3

Western Civilization I: Ancient Near East to 1648

HIS 202

50

3

Western Civilization II: 1648 to the Present

HIS 202

50

3

Science and Mathematics

Biology

BIO 141 & BIO 241

66

8

Chemistry

Contact Chemistry

Department Chair

Contact Chemistry

Department Chair

Contact Chemistry

Department Chair

Calculus

MAT 115

65

4

College Algebra

Fulfills prerequisite requirement **

65

See below **

College Mathematics

MAT 111

65

3

General Subject Area Tests

Humanities

Humanities general education credit

50

3

Natural Sciences

Natural sciences general education credit

50

3

Social Sciences and History

Social Science general education credit

50

3

* Students who earn a score between 55 and 59 on the CLEP English Composition (with essay) exam may request a review by the Director of Composition to determine whether or not ENG 101 credit can be awarded.

** UIS does not award college-level credit for MAT 101 based on the CLEP College Algebra exam, but a score of 65 or above on the CLEP College Algebra exam does meet the prerequisite requirement for MAT 113 or MAT 114.

AP Credit

The Advanced Placement Program (AP), administered by the College Board allows high school students to take college-level course work (for further information on the AP Program, visit the College Board’s website at http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/ap/about.html). College credit is awarded to those students who earn sufficiently high grades on AP examinations covering basic freshman-course subject matter. Only scores of 3 or higher are accepted for college-level credit at UIS, but the scores accepted for credit vary from exam to exam. It is the student’s responsibility to have official test results sent from the College Board to the Office of Admissions before credit can be awarded.

AP Exams

UIS Course

Minimum AP Score Required

Credit Hours

Composition and Literature

English Language

ENG 101

4

4

English Literature

ENG 102

4

4

Business

Microeconomics

ECO 201

4

3

Macroeconomics

ECO 202

4

3

History and Social Sciences

European History

HIS 202

4

3

U.S. History

HIS 203

3

3

World History

HIS 201

3

3

Computer Science A

CSC 325

4

4

Computer Science AB

CSC 375

3

4

Comp Government & Politics

POS 171

4

4

U.S. Government & Politics

POS 201

4

4

Psychology

PSY 201

4

3

Fine Arts

2- Design Portfolio

ART 102

3

3

3-Design Portfolio

ART 112

3

3

Drawing Portfolio

ART 113

3

3

Science and Mathematics

Biology

BIO 141

3

4

Chemistry

CHE 141

4

4

Environmental Science

ENS 251

4

4

Calculus AB

MAT 115

3

4

Calculus BC

MAT 116

3

4

Physics B

ASP 201

4

4

Physics C Mechanics

ASP 201

4

4

Physics C Electricity & Magnetism

ASP 202

4

4

Statistics

MAT 121

3

4

International Baccalaureate Credit

The International Baccalaureate (IB) Organization offers diploma and certificate programs through which high school students complete college-level course work (for further information on the IB Program, visit the IB website at http://www.ibo.org). College credit is awarded to students who earn a minimum score of five on Standard and Higher Level exams. Credit for specific UIS course work will be determined on a case-by-case basis. It is the student’s responsibility to have official IB transcripts sent to the Office of Admissions before credit can be awarded.

Engaged Citizenship Common Experience

All undergraduate students are required to take a minimum of 13 hours in the Engaged Citizenship Common Experience (ECCE), a set of courses tied to UIS’ heritage, mission, vision, and values. These courses provide a distinctive element to the baccalaureate education at UIS, and encourage a commitment to making a difference in the world. Most of the course work in this category is interdisciplinary and is designed to help students recognize the value of multiple perspectives. ECCE categories help students meet the Goals and Learning Outcomes for Baccalaureate Education listed above, particularly Goal Five, Engaged Citizenship.

The Engaged Citizenship Common Experience (ECCE) includes 200-, 300-, and 400-level courses and the following categories:

U.S. Communities (1 course, 3 hours)

Courses in this category aim to broaden students’ knowledge about substantial, distinctive, and complex aspects of the history, society, politics, and culture of United States communities.

Global Awareness (1 course, 3 hours)

Courses in this category help students to understand and function in an increasingly interdependent and globalizing environment and to develop an appreciation of other cultural perspectives. They foster awareness of other cultures, polities, or natural environments, past or present.

Engagement Experience (3 hours)

This category offers students structured opportunities to integrate knowledge, practice, and reflection in the context of an engaged citizenship experience. Students may fulfill this part of the ECCE curriculum through an Experiential and Service-Learning internship, Credit for Prior Learning, a service-learning course, a research project, a group project course, or study abroad, among others.

Some degree programs may require students to take particular ECCE courses. Students should consult with advisors in the major for further guidance.

Students who desire or are required to complete a 6-hour Experiential and Service-Learning (EXL) internship or project may do so by combining 3 hours of Engagement Experience and 3 hours of ECCE elective.

ECCE Elective (3 hours)

This category is designed to provide flexibility in the ECCE curriculum by offering students various opportunities to expand their Engaged Citizenship Common Experience. Electives fall into three areas:

1. Experiential and Service-Learning credit, study abroad, Credit for Prior Learning, research projects, or group project courses, among others.

2. Additional course work related to engaged citizenship, which includes a second ECCE course in U.S. Communities or Global Awareness, an “On-Going Controversies” course, and modern languages (third semester only). On-Going Controversies courses address complex issues of significance to society in a local, national, or global context. They include a range of interdisciplinary perspectives and require students to examine controversial topics, including ethics and values, from scholarly points of view.

3. Third semester language classes at the level of Intermediate I, or the equivalent at other institutions, may count for credit for the ECCE Elective by Student Petition. Students should consult an academic advisor for more information.

ECCE Speakers Series (1 hour)

For one semester, students will be required to participate in a series of campus-sponsored lectures by speakers who exemplify engaged citizenship. Credit will be awarded upon completion of all course requirements. Students must complete one hour of Speakers Series course work, but may take an additional hour in a different semester if desired.

Courses taken to meet the 13 hours of ECCE requirements cannot be used to meet general education course work, but they may count toward requirements, electives, or prerequisites in the major and minor.

Assessment of General Education

Assessment of general education will involve both direct and indirect measures of student learning based on the Goals and Learning Outcomes for Baccalaureate Education and on the established criteria for courses in the curriculum. Students are required to participate in general education assessment.

Undergraduate Degree Programs and Related Information

Majors

UIS awards the following baccalaureate degrees:

Accountancy (B.A.)

Biology (B.S.)

Business Administration (B.B.A.)

Chemistry (B.S.)

Clinical Laboratory Science (B.S.)

Communication (B.A.)

Computer Science (B.S.)

Criminal Justice (B.A.)

Economics (B.A.)

English (B.A.)

Global Studies (B.A.)

History (B.A.)

Legal Studies (B.A.)

Liberal Studies (B.A.)

Management (B.A.)

Mathematical Sciences (B.A.)

Philosophy (B.A.)

Political Science (B.A.)

Psychology (B.A.)

Social Work (B.S.W.)

Sociology/Anthropology (B.A.)

Visual Arts (B.A.)

Note: Students may pursue certification as an elementary or secondary teacher by enrolling in one of UIS’ teacher education minors, which is taken in combination with an appropriate academic major.

Assessment in the Major

Academic programs assess their students’ ability to meet program learning outcomes. Assessment processes vary by program. Students are required to participate in program assessments.

Double Major

To earn a bachelor’s degree in two major areas of study, all requirements for each major must be completed. Courses from one program may be used as electives in the other. All requirements for the bachelor’s degree must be met.

Minors

UIS offers minors that allow students to study outside major degree programs. UIS awards the following minors:

Accountancy
African-American Studies
Anthropology
Biology
Business Administration
Chemistry
Communication
Computer Science
Criminal Justice
Economics
English
Environmental Studies
History
International Studies
Management Information Systems
Mathematical Sciences
Philosophy
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
Teacher Education – Elementary
Teacher Education – Secondary
Visual Arts
Women and Gender Studies

Obtaining a Second Bachelor’s Degree

Those who have already earned a baccalaureate degree and seek a second one from UIS must complete all hours toward the major that are required by the academic program. A minimum of 30 semester hours toward the second degree must be completed at UIS. If the first degree was earned at another institution, the student must meet UIS Engaged Citizenship Common Experience (ECCE) requirements.

Other Academic Opportunities

Thematic Activities: These activities explore current issues and problems through multidisciplinary courses, research, conferences, experiential learning opportunities, and community outreach. UIS currently offers a thematic option in Astronomy/Physics.

Modern Languages: Elementary and intermediate courses are offered in Arabic, French, German, Japanese, Russian, and Spanish that emphasize understanding and speaking skills. Placement tests may be required to determine the appropriate entry level course work for each student.

University Courses: These courses provide knowledge and skills in academic areas that are not within established academic units.

Experiential and Service-Learning Programs:

Applied Study and Experiential Learning Terms stress practical experience, professional development, and self-directed learning by providing an academically sponsored learning experience that is an opportunity to learn from the community. Only degree-seeking UIS students can participate. Internships are available at local businesses, non-profit organizations, health service organizations, state agencies, legislative offices, and educational institutions. Some programs have their own experiential component integrated into the curriculum. The variety of curricular options is described more fully in the Experiential and Service-Learning (EXL) section of this catalog. These internships fulfill portions of the Engaged Citizenship Common Experience.

Service-Learning Program courses combine learning with providing service to communities in need.  The service that students perform is combined with self-reflection, self-discovery, and new learning skills and knowledge.  Not only do service-learning courses enrich student’s learning experience, but they also fulfill portions of the Engaged Citizenship Common Experience.

Credit for Prior Learning allows qualified students to earn academic credit for college-level learning acquired outside the classroom and is particularly valuable to those with an extensive background in a profession, in workshops or seminars, in community service and volunteer work, in relevant travel or hobbies, and/or in independent research. Credit for Prior Learning may fulfill portions of the Engaged Citizenship Common Experience.